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Outcomes of the second WIPO regional seminar: #Copyright4Libraries in the African Region

IFLA - Thu, 27/06/2019 - 13:48

By Denise Nicholson, CLM Expert Advisor

African countries have very different copyright laws, all at various stages of development and/or review. Some countries have very outdated copyright laws, whilst others have amended their copyright laws more recently, or are in the process of reviewing them, for example, Kenya and South Africa.

At the international and even regional levels, African countries have not taken into account the needs of libraries, archives, and education and research institutions in the past. Their laws often do not facilitate access or enable librarians and archivists to carry out their mandated responsibilities and functions. This is one of the reasons why the Africa Group proposed a Treaty on Limitations and Exceptions for Education and Research, Libraries and Archives and People with Disabilities in 2011. Although this proposal still forms part of the World Intellectual Property Organisation's (WIPO) Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) documentation for consideration, little or no progress has been made on it to date. 

African librarians and others representing the educational, library, archival and museum communities hoped they would find some progress and/or solutions when they attended the second of three WIPO regional seminar in Nairobi, Kenya 12-13 June 2019. These seminars form part of an action plan agreed upon by member states at the 36th session of the SCCR in Geneva. 

The theme of the Kenya workshop was to focus on the copyright challenges of libraries, archives and museums, as well as education and research, and to find solutions, especially to address digital issues and cross-border exchange of information. The meeting was chaired by Sylvie Forbin, Deputy Director General of WIPO, and the plenary session speakers were Professor Yaniv Benhamou, Professor Kenneth Crews, Professor David Sutton and Professor Raquel Xalabarder. Part of the 2-day workshop was dedicated to Challenges and Opportunities, which were discussed by member states and other participants in three parallel working groups, set up according to countries and languages (English and French).  

IFLA was represented at the meeting by Hala Essalmawi (Egypt) and Denise Nicholson (South Africa) whilst Jonathan Band (US) represented IFLA and ICA. Teresa Hackett represented EIFL, Teresa Nobre (Portugal) represented Communia and Pedi Anawi (Ghana) represented Education International. Razia Saleh, a senior archivist, represented the Nelson Mandela Foundation in South Africa. A number of teacher unions were also represented from South Africa, Ghana and Kenya. 

Together with the abovementioned representatives, librarians from a number of African countries played a crucial role in presenting examples of the responsibilities and functions of libraries and archives, and the daily challenges that they face because of inadequate copyright laws. They highlighted the lack of adequate or appropriate copyright limitations and exceptions for libraries and archives, as well as education and research, in their national legislation. Suggestions to address cross-border sharing of knowledge, as well as digitisation and preservation through an international instrument were offered as solutions by a number of library and education participants in their working groups. While some member states took note of this possible way forwards, others dismissed in favour of licensing or national interventions rather than international solutions. To that, observers pointed out that the option of licensing, promoted by many rights-owners present, is limited, expensive and does not address their needs or enable them to carry out their statutory mandates effectively.  

Whilst some member state officials supported an international instrument as a workable solution, others felt that national laws could be improved by states with inadequate or outdated legislation without international guidance. No clear solutions or consensus on the way forward for the African region was achieved with regard to the above challenges raised by representatives from libraries, archives, and museums, and educational and research institutions, but the exchange of intelligence will provide guidance for the next steps. 

The Next Steps

The results of these discussions at Kenya will be included in a report that includes the results of the meeting held in Singapore (29-30 Apil 2019), and the forthcoming meeting in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (4-5 July 2019).  The final comprehensive report will form part of the discussions at the WIPO Global Conference in Geneva in October 2019, and will advise the WIPO SCCR on possible future action. IFLA, ICA, Communia and Education International and other related organisations will be attending the conference and all subsequent meetings of SCCR to continue to find a workable solution for libraries, archives, museums, education and research.

The IFLA Metadata Newsletter June 2019 issue is published

IFLA - Thu, 27/06/2019 - 12:58

The IFLA Metadata Newsletter vol. 5. no. 1, June 2019 is a cooperation between the Bibliography Section, The Cataloguing Section and the Subject Analysis and Access Section.

In this issue, you will find information about WLIC 2019 in Athens and satellite meetings, reports from recent meetings, standards and news from countries around the world.

4Science at Open Repositories 2019: Thank You!

DSpace news - Wed, 26/06/2019 - 18:51

We just got back from Open Repositories 2019 . Thank you to all who came to attend our many presentations and visited our stand, enjoying the Lavazza coffee prepared by our staff to the cry of: “Our repositories are as good as our coffee!”

PAC Centres developing new capacity building efforts

IFLA - Wed, 26/06/2019 - 12:41

IFLA’s Preservation and Conservation Centres play a valuable role in IFLA’s work to safeguard cultural heritage. By bringing together experience and expertise from all over the globe, they form a powerful network. The PAC Centres are currently working to strengthen the collaboration further, to the benefit of the whole global library field.

A Global Network

Since the creation of the Programme in 1984, the PAC Centres have represented a unique part of IFLA. They form a global network – with members on five continents – working to promote cooperation and excellence in the preservation of library materials. They are core to the work of IFLA’s Strategic Programme on Preservation and Conservation (PAC) and persist knowledge in areas such as digital preservation, disaster risk management, traditional preservation and conservation and more.

The PAC Centres participate in international conferences and meetings, engage with international stakeholders such as UNESCO and Blue Shield, and host training and workshops.

Knowledge sharing as a main effort

The many PAC Centres have shown a leadership in the field both regionally and internationally, and are continuously aiming to provide capacity building for libraries and others.

The Centres are currently working on a FAQ Sheet that reflects the knowledge and expertise of the PAC Centres. The FAQ Sheet aims to build collaborations between the centres and support both the sharing of best practices and the development of guidance within the field.

For the FAQ Sheet, each PAC Centre has chosen one or more topics that reflects the PAC Centre’s expertise and knowledge. From the topic chosen, the Centres have produced a dozen simple questions and best practices answers for libraries in the region and around the globe. The Sheet also includes an extensive literature list and information on how to learn more.

Areas of expertise and topics that are covered in the FAQ Sheet are How to do efficient preventive conservation in your climate, document storage mode, paper conservation, risk management and preventive conservation and many more!

Though the FAQ Sheet is still under development, we would love to share some examples of what the PAC Centres have in store for you.

Below are a few examples of the many questions and answers that you will find in the PAC FAQ Sheet.

Choosing Storage Material

Are any commercial products okay to use?

Storage materials for general library collection should be lignin-free, sulphur-free, alkaline buffered, and have a high cellulosic content. Archival-quality enclosures include boxes, envelopes, and folders are available commercially in a range of shapes and sizes.

Iron Gall Ink

What materials and collections contain iron gall ink?

Iron gall ink was used to create a myriad of written and artistic works. Before the introduction of the printing press in Europe, manuscripts in all academic disciplines were written with iron gall ink. It was used by governments and businessmen for official records and to create personal letters, diaries, and ephemera.  Maps were drawn with it, and European artists used it for preliminary and finished sketches. In addition, iron gall ink documents were produced to further European commercial and imperial interests in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Oceania. As a result documents, manuscripts, maps and art works are found in libraries, archives and museums around the world.

Risk Management

Isn’t risk defined as consequences x likelihood?

Well not really. This definition is used sometimes but it is a bit misleading and does not help you to understand the risk. When identifying risks it is important to have a really good understanding of their source and what they might result in, for example “risk of fading and colour change due to exposure to UV radiation and high lighting levels”. This can help you determine the severity of the impact (consequences) and the likelihood of it occurring in the specific instance you are looking at, and then how you might treat that risk in a cost-effective way.

Determining the severity of the impact (consequences) and the likelihood of the risk being realised is the most common form of risk analysis. Consequences x likelihood can give you a risk rating which helps you to determine the priority of treating a risk as compared to others you have identified and analysed. This is vital for planning.

Meet the PAC Centres at World Library and Information Congress in Athens and learn more about the upcoming work and the capacity building efforts.

Join the Movement: IFLA Shares Plans, Invites Engagement in Delivering the Global Vision at ALA Annual

IFLA - Tue, 25/06/2019 - 10:17

IFLA’s President Glòria Pérez-Salmerón and Secretary General Gerald Leitner are participating in the 2019 American Library Association Annual Conference, held in Washington DC.

In preparation for the launch of a new IFLA Strategy, they are inviting American library and information workers to engage in IFLA’s effort to build a strong and united global library field.

The upcoming Strategy is the result of a uniquely inclusive process, with over 30 000 people contributing their ideas. This is leading to a new type of strategy for IFLA, focusing on inspiring, engaging, enabling and connecting the field.

It is not only a framework for the actions of IFLA’s sections and headquarters, but also an offer to libraries and library associations everywhere, allowing for greater alignment and effectiveness in support of the field and the people it serves, and a stronger global voice.  

​The success of the strategy will depend on all library and information workers taking action, and raising their voices. With so many great ideas, initiatives and energy in the United States, the American library field has an indispensable role to play. 

IFLA looks forwards to working with libraries globally to make a reality of the vision of a strong and united library field powering literate, informed and participatory societies.

IFLA at EuroDIG 2019

IFLA - Tue, 25/06/2019 - 04:16

The 2019 edition of the European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) took place in The Hague from 19-21 June.

This year, IFLA was involved in organising a panel on the European Copyright Reform (a video recording of the session will be published on the EuroDIG2019 wiki), and attended sessions on a broad range of subjects in order to take stock of the latest developments in the field of internet policies. Below are the key takeaways for the library field:

Artificial Intelligence will play an increasingly large role in internet governance. AI will take on a growing number of tasks - from network operation, to routers using AI technology, to the filtering of online content. This will have an effect on libraries as physical points of access to the internet, as well as on broader matters of freedom of speech, freedom of expression, and access to information.

Digital literacy needs are evolving: new skills are needed in order to avoid online harms, participate in public debate  on the regulation of new technologies, find work or understand where automated decision-making is being used, and its impact.

In several discussions, media literacy, news literacy, data literacy and algorithmic literacy were suggested as necessary complements to basic digital literacy.

As new and interactive methods of teaching these skills are developed (for instance, the "Unbias Fairness Toolkit"), libraries can combine them with their traditional expertise on assessing the quality of data and information to offer comprehensive and sophisticated literacy programmes.

The Digital Divide remains: Even though the conversation on access to information has largely shifted towards advanced literacy and media content, several stakeholders pointed out the slow progress in reducing inequalities in physical internet access.

As long as these remain, the role of libraries as public and affordable points of access is important.

The shape of internet governance is rapidly changing. The current non-binding multistakeholder model of internet governance, which leaves a lot of space for self-regulation is being challenged. Governments seem to want to play a growing role, which may mean more binding rules.

As the situation develops, IFLA will support its members to participate in these discussions at the national level in order to express the needs, values and possible contributions of libraries.

For more information on recent and upcoming events in the field of internet governance, please visit the Internet Governance Forum website.

FAIRness of Repositories & Their Data: Research Data Management Working Group Report

LIBER news - Mon, 24/06/2019 - 17:26

The results of two data repositories surveys, carried out by LIBER’s Research Data Management Working Group, are now available. The report, which can be downloaded from Zenodo, summarises the answers given by managers, librarians and technical staff with regards to: The FAIRness of repositories and their data; Misconceptions related to the principles’ definition and implementation;…

The post FAIRness of Repositories & Their Data: Research Data Management Working Group Report appeared first on LIBER.

Case Studies on European Open Science Skilling and Training Initiatives

LIBER news - Mon, 24/06/2019 - 16:55

In a rapidly changing digital world, libraries are regularly re-assessing existing services and offering new ones to support research evolutions. Librarians with up-to-date digital skills can provide invaluable support to library users, and will personally benefit from better career prospects: this is why LIBER’s Digital Skills for Library Staff and Researchers Working Group is working…

The post Case Studies on European Open Science Skilling and Training Initiatives appeared first on LIBER.

VIVO Updates, June 23, 2019 — Conference poster deadline 7/19, Christian Hauschke on Leadership Group, Nominations for community members, Freya Project

DSpace news - Mon, 24/06/2019 - 02:06

Conference poster deadline July 19  Did you miss a deadline to submit work to the conference?  It’s not too late to submit a poster.  Poster submission is open now at  https://forms.gle/xLGyGsdT58jJBmMc7 through July 19.  Posters can be on any topics related to VIVO – implementation, development, ontology, adoption, representation, data curation, persistent identifiers, and much more.  All our sites are doing interesting work.  Please consider submitting a poster for the conference.

Christian Hauschke on LG  Congratulations to Christian Hauschke of TIB, Hannover who was elected to represent the bronze members of the VIVO Project.  Each year, the bronze members elect a representative to serve on the VIVO Leadership Group.  Welcome Christian!

Becoming a member of the VIVO Project means your institution supports VIVO financially.  This support makes it possible for us to have a project, develop software, and make it available as open source to the community.  Please consider supporting the VIVO project as a member.  You can become a member here:  http://bit.ly/dura-join And if your institution is already a member, thank you!

Community nominations  Each year, the VIVO community elects three members of the community to serve on the VIVO Leadership Group.  Community members at member institutions nominate members of the community who are eager and able to serve to help develop and execute strategy for the project.  Anyone may be nominated.  Nominations are open through June 28 (this Friday).  See http://bit.ly/2ZKGhYt . Self nominations are welcome.

Freya PID graph The Freya Project is a large scale EU project to assemble identified data about scholarship.  They are building an open knowledge graph that they called a “PID graph” for persistent identifier (PID).  The VIVO community has significant experience with building knowledge graphs at the institutional level, curating and identifying data.  Learn more about Freya, and their approach here:  https://www.project-freya.eu/en/blogs/blogs/the-pid-graph

Go VIVO!

Mike

Mike Conlon
VIVO Project Director

The post VIVO Updates, June 23, 2019 — Conference poster deadline 7/19, Christian Hauschke on Leadership Group, Nominations for community members, Freya Project appeared first on Duraspace.org.

LIBER Libraries and Digital Humanities: A Survey

LIBER news - Fri, 21/06/2019 - 15:21

If you have followed the LIBER mailing list and this blog you will have seen that the Digital Humanities and Digital Cultural Heritage working group has issued a LIBER-wide survey on digital humanities (DH). We are very pleased to now share the report following this survey with you! The report is now available on Zenodo…

The post LIBER Libraries and Digital Humanities: A Survey appeared first on LIBER.

Young librarians changing libraries in Africa

EIFL-OA news and events - Fri, 21/06/2019 - 13:18

In May 2019, I joined six young public library innovators from Africa at the 3rd African Library and Information Associations and Institutions (AfLIA) Conference and 5th African Library Summit in Nairobi, Kenya. The conference was a rich learning ground for the young librarians, who were all there as a result of their participation in the Initiative for Young African Library Innovators (IYALI).

Young librarians changing libraries in Africa

EIFL - FOSS news - Fri, 21/06/2019 - 13:18

In May 2019, I joined six young public library innovators from Africa at the 3rd African Library and Information Associations and Institutions (AfLIA) Conference and 5th African Library Summit in Nairobi, Kenya. The conference was a rich learning ground for the young librarians, who were all there as a result of their participation in the Initiative for Young African Library Innovators (IYALI).

Young librarians changing libraries in Africa

EIFL news and events - Fri, 21/06/2019 - 13:18

In May 2019, I joined six young public library innovators from Africa at the 3rd African Library and Information Associations and Institutions (AfLIA) Conference and 5th African Library Summit in Nairobi, Kenya. The conference was a rich learning ground for the young librarians, who were all there as a result of their participation in the Initiative for Young African Library Innovators (IYALI).

WLIC 2019, Session 259: #marketinggenius - Beg, Borrow, or Steal Great Ideas from Around the World

IFLA - Thu, 20/06/2019 - 00:48

Tue., 27 August 2019, 8:30 - 1:30 at Mitropopulos

Join us for presentations by IFLA PressReader International Marketing Award Winners 2019 and a keynote speech by Bonnie Mager from Invercargill City Libraries and Archives, New Zealand.

Bonnie Mager (keynote), Invercargill City Libraries and Archives, New Zealand: Werk. Slay. Yas Queen! Embracing the confusing world of social media.

IFLA PressReader International Marketing Award Winners 2019:
3rd Place Winner: Story Seat - 10 seats, 10 stories, 10 parks, Sunshinecoast Libraries, Australia
2nd Place Winner: Taskukirjasto tutuksi / Bring Pocket Library to Light, Vantaa City Library, Finland
1st Place Winner: UBC Library Digital Colouring Books Campaign, University of British Columbia, Canada

True Marketing Workshop, Christie Koontz, Florida State University, United States

WLIC 2019, Session 259: #marketinggenius - Beg, Borrow, or Steal Great Ideas from Around the World

IFLA - Thu, 20/06/2019 - 00:48

Tue., 27 August 2019, 8:30 - 1:30 at Mitropopulos

Join us for presentations by IFLA PressReader International Marketing Award Winners 2019 and a keynote speech by Bonnie Mager from Invercargill City Libraries and Archives, New Zealand.

Bonnie Mager (keynote), Invercargill City Libraries and Archives, New Zealand: Werk. Slay. Yas Queen! Embracing the confusing world of social media.

FLA PressReader International Marketing Award Winners 2019:
3rd Place Winner: Story Seat - 10 seats, 10 stories, 10 parks, Sunshinecoast Libraries, Australia
2nd Place Winner: Taskukirjasto tutuksi / Bring Pocket Library to Light, Vantaa City Library, Finland
1st Place Winner: UBC Library Digital Colouring Books Campaign, University of British Columbia, Canada

True Marketing Workshop, Christie Koontz, Florida State University, United States

2019 IFLAPARL Pre-Conference

IFLA - Wed, 19/06/2019 - 22:25

Please note that registration for the 2019 pre-conference has now closed, as we have reached the maximum number of participants.  If you have any queries regarding your registration for the pre-conference please email Steve Wise (at flaparl.chair@gmail.com).

If you have not already registered but would still like to attend, if possible, there will be a waiting list if places should become available.  Please email Steve (at iflaparl.chair@gmail.com) if you would like to join the waiting list. 

The details and programme for the pre-conference will continue to be updated on our events pages over the next few weeks.

Fedora Workshop, Staatsarchiv Bern, Switzerland, Aug 22

DSpace news - Tue, 18/06/2019 - 21:47

On August 22,2019 the State Archives Basel-Stadt and St. Gallen will host a Fedora Workshop with high-caliber speakers from Lyrasis/DuraSpace/Fedora: Product Manager David Wilcox and Technical Lead Andrew Wood will discuss Fedora 4 (currently 5.0.2) which replaces the Fedora 3.8 version currently running on many archives. Unlike Fedora 3.8 (XML and Relational Database), Fedora 4 builds on RDF and Triplestore.

This is a far-reaching change, presenting new opportunities that need to be examined in depth and discussed by the community to make sustainable use of them possible. Since many members of KOST use Fedora open source repository software, but the resources for building knowledge are scarce, a coordinated approach is appropriate.

The workshop will  be held in English .

Program

August 22

  • 9:00 – 9:30
    Welcome, introductions, VM setup
    Presenter: All
  • 9:30 – 10:30
    Introduction to Fedora: Resource Management, Versioning
  • 10:30 – 11:00
    Break
  • 11:00 – 12:00
    Introduction to Fedora: Authorization, Fixity, Messaging
  • 12:00 – 13:00
    Lunch
  • 13:00 – 14:30
    Introduction to the OCFL and Fedora 6.0
  • 14:30 – 14:45
    Break
  • 14:45 – 15:45
    Migrating to Fedora
  • 15:45 – 16:00
    Break
  • 16:00 – 16:30
    External Integrations
  • 16:30 – 17:00
    Wrap-up and discussion
    Presenter: All

Registration

The number of participants is limited to 30 people.

The workshop will take place in the State Archives Bern, Falkenplatz 4, 3001 Bern.

Registration is required and will be open until August 16,.2019.

Please send your binding registration fee to markus.loch@bs.ch. The workshop fee (CHF 150) must be paid by August 16,.20199 to IBAN CH73 0900 0000 9000 0644 5, recipient: Staatsbuchhaltung, 9000 St. Gallen. Please note the payment message “KAKU 101210 / 3E.VS.039” and the name of the participant.

The post Fedora Workshop, Staatsarchiv Bern, Switzerland, Aug 22 appeared first on Duraspace.org.

Supporting Sustainable Development Globally: Libraries at the UN Regional Forums

IFLA - Tue, 18/06/2019 - 20:53

In preparation for global meetings on the SDGs in July and September, IFLA has been active at the regional level. The message: that at all levels, and across the 2030 Agenda, libraries and access to information are indispensable for progress.

The process that leads to the High level Political Forum in July in New York each year passes through a series of meetings organised by each of the United Nations’ regional commissions.

These are opportunities to focus on progress – and challenges – at a continental level, and share the ideas that can help countries accelerate towards delivering the SDGs.

Libraries in all regions have much to contribute to success. IFLA has been happy to support them in showing this.

Africa

For the Africa Regional Forum on Sustainable Development, over 1100 met in Marrakesh, Morroco on 16-18 April. They focused on the theme of empowering people and ensuring inclusiveness and equality.

With just 11 years remaining to the 2030 Agenda, Africa is still far behind in the implementation of the SDGs – a major concern for participants at the Forum.

Damilare Oyedele, Co-founder & Chief Executive: Library and You represented International Federation of Library Association and Institutions (IFLA), underlining that libraries were ready to do their part.

Through a presentation at the side event organised by the NGO Major Group Africa, he explained to participants that access to information was a prerequisite for achieving the SDGs and Agenda 2063.

At other side events, he was able to reinforce the point that there is no access to information without functional and efficient libraries. This allowed for further discussion on how to realise the promise of libraries as drivers of development and motors of change. Ongoing work to explore and set out the impact of libraries would help reinforce the case.

Arab Region

Countries from the United Nations Western Asia region came together in Beirut on 9-11 April 2019. With a focus on some of the key SDG themes for this year – education, equality and political engagement – it was a strong opportunity to highlight what libraries can contribute.

The importance of information for governments was key. When decisions are taken that affect millions of people, there is a pressing need for them to be based on the best evidence, and properly implemented. But this is often lacking in a region that remains off-track on several essential goals.

Dr Fawz Abdullah and Randa Chidiac represented IFLA, participating in sessions on the engagement of adolescents and youth, rethinking inequality, and the need to find ways to support groups at greatest risk of exclusion. They intervened in each session, underlining the need to engage and empower people through information.

They also noted the work that libraries in Lebanon are already doing to promote inclusion, how IFLA helped in this, and encouraged all participants to go home and contact their library associations in order to realise this promise.

Europe and Latin America and the Caribbean

Libraries also took part in the meetings in Geneva and Santiago de Chile, once again setting out the importance of access to information for development.

In Geneva, representatives used the opportunity to engage with national delegates in order to ensure the inclusion of libraries in national development strategies.

In Santiago, the library at the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) held a workshop on the role of big data in development.

With the power – and potential risks – of this technology becoming clearer, the importance of the action, skills and values of libraries becomes more important. The contribution both of the ECLAC library, and local Chilean libraries, made for a successful event with some powerful messages.

Building on this contribution, IFLA looks forward to the High-Level Political Forum next month, and new opportunities to show how libraries are indispensable partners for development.

2019 LIBER Executive Board Nominations: Meet The Candidates

LIBER news - Tue, 18/06/2019 - 16:47

At LIBER’s 2019 Meeting of Participants, appointments will be made to fill four Executive Board vacancies. Eleven applications have been received. The candidates are: Ms Monica Crump, Head of Collections, James Hardman Library, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland Dr Andreas Brandtner MBA MSc, Library Director, University Library of Freie Universität Berlin, Germany Dr Adam…

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European Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market: what it is about and why libraries should care

IFLA - Tue, 18/06/2019 - 15:16

On 17 May 2019, after several years of discussion, the European Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market was published in the official journal of the European Union. It enters into force on 20 June 2019, which marks the beginning of a two-year period for member states to change their laws in order to meet the objectives of the directive.

The text is the first comprehensive review of copyright in the European Union since the Infosoc Directive of 2001, and may well be the last for another fifteen years. It aims to harmonise copyright in the EU, and to update the copyright framework to the digital world.

The content of the Directive in a nutshell

The Directive contains several provisions that impact cultural heritage institutions directly, namely:

Text and data mining

The directive gives legal clarity for text and data mining activities. Member states will have to adopt an exception applicable to research organisations, with no possibility for rightsholders to reserve this right. All other organisations or individuals, for any purpose, will also benefit from an exception to copyright for text and data mining of legally accessed works, although in this case rightsholders will have the possibility to reserve this right.

Online and cross-border teaching

The Directive establishes that use of copyrighted work in online and cross-border teaching in the European Union will be covered by an exception, unless the conditions are fulfilled for licences to be used.

Preservation of cultural heritage

While many EU member states have an exception for preservation, this now becomes mandatory in the whole Union. The new provision also gives legal clarity for cross-border preservation networks and allows for certain internal copying related to preservation to be carried out under the exception.

Digitization and making available of out-of-commerce works

After the rather unsuccessful efforts to increase access to orphan works, out of commerce works are approached differently in this Directive: an exception to copyright will apply, unless collective management organisations representative of creators in a particular category of work can give licenses. In this case, they will be able to give licenses to cultural heritage institutions for the digitisation and making available of works not only by their members, but also by non-members.  

Protection of the public domain

The directive mandates that faithful copies of works of visual art that are in the public domain shall remain in the public domain.

Some other good news beyond these specific articles is that for most exceptions and limitations to copyright, technological protection measures that stop beneficiaries from enjoying them can now be circumvented. Contractual conditions that also stop cultural heritage institutions from benefitting from exceptions and limitations can be overridden.

It is worth noting that the directive has other focuses beyond these cultural heritage-specific articles, which can still have an impact to access to information. This is the case for Article 15 (former article 11) on the protection of press publications concerning online uses, and article 17 (former article 13), on the use of protected content by online content-sharing service providers. In this case, care will be needed to ensure that the safeguards for libraries in the Directive are also present in national implementation.

Next steps

Libraries in Europe have engaged strongly in shaping this important piece of legislation to ensure that it fulfils its promise of harmonising Europe’s copyright law and updating it to the digital environment. Yet discussions are far from over. Work at the national level will be essential if Europe’s libraries are to get the best of what this text has to offer.

IFLA, working alongside partner library and research organisations, will assist its members in this task. We have established a discussion list for those involved in lobbying on the implementation of this Directive at national level, that we encourage you to join. We will also share guidance on the advocacy process that you can undertake at the national level, and an article-by-article analysis of the Directive’s provisions.

For more information, check the resources page on the EU copyright reform.

Don't hesitate to get in touch for any questions.

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