IFLA

Syndicate content
Updated: 1 hour 17 min ago

#IFLAFromHome in Latvia: An Innovative National Conference in Line with the IFLA Strategy

Wed, 03/06/2020 - 12:56

Last February we spotted the great action being taken by the Library Association of Latvia (LAL) in order to make the IFLA Strategy a reality at the national level. LAL planned to make the Strategy central to this year’s Festival of Latvian Libraries 2020, organised in close collaboration with the National Library of Latvia.

Of course, COVID-19 forced plans to change, but it did not stop them! The IFLA Strategy continued to inspire them and even during such extraordinary circumstances, LAL found new and innovative ways to strengthen and develop the skills of Latvian librarians.

Take a look at this inspiring story which showcases a great example of engagement by a library association with the IFLA Strategy.

The Online Congress of the Library Association of Latvia: “Inspire, Engage, Enable, Connect!”


The IFLA Strategy proved to be a great inspiration and a unique engagement opportunity for the Association, as they transferred their conference into a virtual one, providing a strong example of how to engage with the IFLA Strategic Directions and Key Initiatives 1.3, 2.4, 3.3 & 4.3

The 13th Congress of Latvian Librarians itself took place on 23 April 2020 with the theme “Inspire, Engage, Enable, Connect!” as the highlight of the country’s Library Week.

For the first time in the history of Association, it was organized online using Zoom.

The event gave a unique and unprecedented experience to Latvian librarians, strengthened LAL’s ability to keep up with the times and use innovative technologies, as well as providing an opportunity to LAL members to test their ICT skills and engage with IFLA activities.

With the incorporation of the IFLA Strategy as the conference’s theme and the many online presentations closely connected to the IFLA Strategy, plus our IFLA President Christine Mackenzie’s keynote to open the Congress, LAL managed to turn a global agenda into local action.

The video of President Mackenzie’s speech is now available on LAL’s YouTube channel.

IFLA President Christine Mackenzie said:

The IFLA Strategy is an offer not just for IFLA HQ or for the GB or for the sections, but for the whole library field. My presidential theme is ‘Let’s Work Together’, and I’m convinced that in this time it’s more important than ever that we do that. So, I’d ask you to work together to make libraries as good as they can be.”

How they did it:

To help Latvian librarians understand the theme of the Library Week, engage with the IFLA Strategy, feel comfortable with their virtual conference participation and provide support for remote library activities to the public, LAL created a number of useful resources.

 

They:

  • Translated the IFLA Membership leaflet into Latvian and shared it with the library community in order to promote IFLA and the importance of the international dimension of the library field
  • Asked their keynote speaker, the IFLA President, to record her speech and created Latvian subtitles before sharing it with the library community
  • Organised an introductory webinar of the online congress

Moderators were available during all the time of the online congress giving participants the opportunity to call in case of confusion or problems connecting to or working in the online platform.

The theme “Inspire, Engage, Enable, Connect” in the emergency situation caused by the Covid-19 pandemic has proven to be particularly strong, as people need inspiration, involvement, opportunities and unity in these circumstances, and libraries are the ones who can help people withstand this hard time.

Although Latvian libraries were limited in their ability to organise Library Week events on site, they took advantage of contemporary technologies to convincingly demonstrate the role and importance of libraries in the society.

In order to provide support for remote library activities to the public, LAL offered free online Zoom space to their members, which strongly connects to the IFLA Strategy Key Initiative 2.4.

This gave libraries the possibility to organise their own online events,  virtual meetings with authors, online conversations and other online creative events—linking them to the IFLA Strategy.

Together with the free use of a platform, LAL also offered moderation and consulting support for webinars, an offer taken up twice in the Library Week, with seven more planned subsequently. This provided a great support for Association members, and it made it possible only to make financial savings but also to acquire new skills, support and motivation to use innovative ICT tools.

More than 250 Library Week activities happened online, from all types of libraries. Some of those campaigns gained great visibility in national magazines, like the campaign “Revive the book – interpret the cover”.

See LAL's detailed report with the examples of what the online Library Week inspired by the IFLA Strategy meant on a local level in Latvia, to give inspiration for the rest of the global library community as well. 

Conclusion

In every situation, you can find both something bad and something good. Thanks to the Library Association of Latvia’s online Congress and online Library Week in these special circumstances, so many interesting and creative events related to the IFLA Strategy took place, demonstrating the courage and skills of librarians and strengthening the contemporary role of libraries as important and modern cultural institutions which are able to inspire, engage, enable and connect Latvian society, and the global library community.

Feedback on LAL’s online congress and library week has been uniformly positive. LAL President and Chief librarian of the Library Development Center at the National Library of Latvia, Māra Jēkabsone said:

 If there was no forbiddance to organize on-site events because of Covid-19, we wouldn’t have dared to organize an online Congress. The IFLA Strategy has given us great inspiration to move this forward and transform our major event into a virtual one. Most importantly, it also set the ground rules for the importance of providing tools and infrastructure that support the work of libraries (Key Initiative 2.2), supporting virtual networking and connections (Key Initiative 2.3), empowering the field at the national and regional levels (Key Initiative 3.3)”.

Make your library association next

Let’s consider this as a precious time to enable organisations to engage with the IFLA Strategy, self-reflect, plan their own strategy and its implementation.

IFLA Secretary General Gerald Leitner said:

Technology gives us a great opportunity to get not only connected, but also inspired, engaged and enabled, just like our IFLA Strategy states. This is as important now as ever before. I invite other Library Associations around the world to think outside of the box, get inspired, engaged, enabled and connected globally using the IFLA Strategy. I do hope to see more actions like those in the future in other countries globally.”

How is your library or library association engaging with the IFLA Strategy? Let us know! Contact Despina Gerasimidou, IFLA’s Strategic Development Officer at despina.gerasimidou@ifla.org and we’ll figure this out together.

We are IFLA
Somos la IFLA
Nous sommes l’IFLA
Wir sind die IFLA
ИФЛА – ЭТО МЫ
我们是国际图联
نحن اإلفا

Call for papers: IFLA Journal Special Issue on Preservation storage and curation strategies

Tue, 02/06/2020 - 16:03

Submission Deadline: 30 September 2020

Best Practices for physical and digital storage

IFLA Journal, IFLA’s Preservation and Conservation Section, and PAC Centres are pleased to announce a call for papers for a special issue focused on storage as a strategic long-term function of libraries, including practices for physical and digital collections based on risk, value, and cost in terms of institutional mission and resources.

Storage of collections and information in ways that support their availability and accessibility is an ongoing requirement, and in many cases a very challenging requirement, for libraries around the world. It tackles both technical and organizational challenges and requires a good understanding of process management. Consideration of many factors are needed to determine how best to provide secure, reliable, and sustainable storage and access solutions in light of budgetary limits, environmental impacts, and the near term and long range goals and obligations of a particular library, archive, or information organization.

IFLA Journal invites papers for a special issue focused on strategic practices for long-term storage and access of both physical and digital collections. Papers should be written in English, of 5,000-10,000 word length, and have an abstract as part of the paper.

Guest Editors:

Reinhard Altenhöner
Deputy Director General
Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin - Preußischer Kulturbesitz
Germany

Jacob Nadal
Director for Preservation
Library of Congress
United States

Papers should explore the general topics of:
  • Storage and access strategies and requirements for different types of collection, physical or digital, such as general published works, pre-print or unpublished works, rare or special collections, or collections with various usage restrictions.
  • Security issues for storage systems, or for different types of collections.
  • Balancing the goals and requirements for a storage strategy with the costs of storage and sustainability practices.
  • Deciding between commercial solutions, cooperatives and partnerships, or sole institutional responsibility for various storage strategies.
Topics of special interest related to physical collections storage are:
  • Best practice for one of the major climate zones (e.g. tropical, subtropical, temperate, or cold) in terms of temperature, humidity, light, and pest control.
  • Additional requirements for general, rare, or special format collections for these zones.
  • Security issues for different types of collections, such as by format, rarity, market value, ideological or political content, for example.
Topics of special interest related to digital collections storage are:
  • Best practice for security, access, reliability, and cost.
  • Requirements for multiple copies and locations including, light, dim, or dark systems.
  • Best practices for using commercial vendors, cloud storage, or institutional repositories.
Submission Deadline:

Articles for the special issue should be submitted to IFLA Journal for peer review before 30 September 2020.

How to Submit a Manuscript

IFLA Journal is hosted on ScholarOne™ Manuscripts, a web based online submission and peer review system SAGE Track. Please read the Manuscript Submission guidelines, and then simply visit the IFLA 

Journal Manuscript submission webpage to login and submit your article online.

IMPORTANT: Please check whether you already have an account in the system before trying to create a new one. If you have reviewed or authored for the journal in the past year it is possible that you will have had an account created.

All papers must be submitted via the online system. If you would like to discuss your paper prior to submission, contact one of the guest editors or the journal’s Editor, Steven Witt.

For instructions on formatting your manuscript please consult the submission guidelines.

 

About IFLA Journal

IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally. All articles are subject to peer review. Articles are published in English. Abstracts are translated by IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) into the other working languages of IFLA—Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Russian or Spanish—for publication.

IFLA Journal is published by Sage Publications and is the official journal of IFLA, and has an international readership consisting of academic institutions, professional organisations, and IFLA Members who all receive a free subscription to the journal.

Each issue of  IFLA Journal is made available Open Access upon publication on IFLA’s website. Authors are also encouraged to make the accepted version of their manuscripts available in their personal or institutional repositories.

IFLA Journal is indexed by the following databases: 

  • Abi/inform
  • Academic Search Premier
  • Business Source Corporate
  • Compendex
  • Current Awareness Abstracts
  • IBZ: International Bibliography of Periodical Literature
  • IBZ: International Bibliography of Periodical Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Information Science and Technology Abstracts
  • Inspec
  • Library Information Science Abstracts
  • Library Literature & Information Science
  • SciVal
  • Scopus
  • Sociological Abstracts
  • Web of Science

Cancellation - Open Session 2020

Mon, 01/06/2020 - 12:39

WLIC 2020 in Dublin is cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The open session that we plannned together with the Knowledge Management Section: Subject Access and Artificial Intelligence: Enhancing competencies and safeguarding ethics, is also cancelled.

Thanks to all contributors; we hope to be able to meet next year!

IFLA ARL Hot Topics 2020

Sun, 31/05/2020 - 11:45

The very popular IFLA ARL Hot Topics session held at the IFLA WLIC each year, will this year be held as a webinar in August. Hot Topics 2020 will have three speakers address the theme of Libraries as Catalysts: Inspire, Engage, Enable, Connect.

The topics will align with the need of libraries for constant evolution to accommodate the needs, expectations and learning styles of their users. These evolutions present an opportunity for libraries, both to evolve for today and plan for future change. How do we, academic librarians and our libraries, position ourselves to lead change on our campuses and the broader communities we serve?

The session will be hour-long with each presenter speaking for three minutes to introduce their topic followed by  group discussion. Please watch this space - we will make further details available very soon!

Libraries and Media Literacy: IFLA to Participate in an EU Project

Thu, 28/05/2020 - 18:44

IFLA is working on a Media Literacy project within the framework of the EU 'Preparatory Action on Media Literacy for All'. The goal is to help deliver on libraries’ potential to be agents of change and champions of media literacy, who continue to help build informed and engaged communities.

The case for media and information literacy today

Media and information literacy – the ability to find, critically assess, apply and interact with information on various media channels – is a crucial skillset in today’s information-dense and hyperconnected world. This competency is key to ensuring meaningful access to information from different media sources – access that empowers people, helps them make informed choices and make the best use of information.

Concerns over misinformation and disinformation have commanded a lot of attention over the last years, showing just how important it is for people to be able to judge the reliability, relevance and quality of information they come across through traditional and new media sources every day.

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic presents many immense challenges for societies worldwide. It also highlights the role media - especially new and digital channels – play in the way society understands and reacts to these developments. Social media, for example, can be a force that either hurts or helps: enabling crucial conversations but also facing the challenges of countering online misinformation about the virus. Media literacy is crucial to build up informed and engaged communities.

Libraries can help

What does this mean for libraries? As information professionals, librarians have long championed information literacy. This focuses on people’s competencies vis-à-vis information at large, whereas media literacy emphasizes the particular role of media, different media content and channels, and its broader societal impact.  Libraries’ experience in developing such competencies – as well as their ability to reach and offer inclusive learning opportunities to their communities – makes them well-positioned to help more people develop media literacy skills.

Recommendations laid out in a 2016 study requested by the European Parliament, for example, include supporting libraries to help realise their potential to improve media and information literacy in their communities. To help deliver on this potential, IFLA is working on an EU-based project curated and coordinated by Tactical Tech, an NGO dedicated to understanding and improving the way digital technologies shape society.

What we will do

The project will offer engaging Media Literacy learning opportunities for the European public through immersive and thought-provoking exhibitions. IFLA is helping arrange for these learning opportunities to be delivered through several public libraries throughout the EU.

The project is taking a look at some of the most pressing media literacy questions the public faces today: online misinformation, digital media ownership, data privacy, tailored content and advertisement delivery, and more! To find out more about the content, take a look at the project webpage: https://theglassroom.org/misinformation.

In cooperation with several libraries in Europe – and once circumstances permit – we will:

  • Help deliver media literacy learning opportunities for their communities;
  • Engage with the representatives of these libraries to help them become media literacy champions;
  • Following the implementation of the project, support and encourage media literacy learning opportunities in libraries in Europe and the world.

We are excited to announce our participation in this project, following several months of preparations together with Tactical Tech and Save the Children Italy. We look forward to seeing how this learning model can be implemented – and how it could be adopted by many more libraries interested in championing media literacy.

IFLA Signs on to ICOLC Statement on Resource Access during COVID-19, Shares Principles for Associations in Negotiations

Wed, 27/05/2020 - 21:08

IFLA has signed onto the Statement by the International Coalition of Library Consortia on the global COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on library services and resources.  To further support members, IFLA's Advisory Committee on Copyright and other Legal Matters has produced principles for use in negotiation with rightholders.

Faced with the need to close their doors for the safety of users and staff alike, libraries around the world have relied heavily on the possibility to offer access to digital materials and services.

The energy and resourcefulness of the field has done a lot, but the best outcomes for users rely on being able to allow remote use of library collections.

While in some countries, copyright rules do allow libraries to find alternative ways to give access, this is not the case everywhere. Libraries therefore very much count on rightholders to take steps to ensure that access is not interrupted for users, that take account of the challenges many libraries are facing in carrying out normal administrative operations, and that allow for a sustainable relationship into the future.

In the light of this, IFLA is happy to sign up to the Statement produced in the International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC), establishing a number of principles to which publishers are invited to adhere.

Many have done so already, in part or in full, as detailed on the ICOLC website. With it clear that the effects of the pandemic are likely to continue for many months into the future, there is a strong need for cooperation.

Furthermore, IFLA’s Advisory Committee on Copyright and other Legal Matters has developed a set of principles for use by library associations in discussions with rightholders at the national level.

These reach beyond academic and research libraries, and can be applicable for all library types.

Recognising that some publishers and writers are also facing uncertainty in the crisis, it sets out a number of areas where actions can be taken which will allow libraries to maintain a comparable level of service to users as before the pandemic, using previously and legitimately acquired content. The principles draw heavily on existing good practice examples in order to underline what is possible.

We hope that they will be useful for IFLA’s members in their work.

You can view the IFLA CLM principles on our publications page. The ICOLC statement is available on the Coalition's website.

Webinar sobre brecha de género, Wikipedia y bibliotecas

Wed, 27/05/2020 - 06:15

En el que participan

Virginia Inés Simón (Argentina) 

Elena Etchemendy (Uruguay) 

David Ramirez (Colombia) 

Constanza Verón (Coordinadora del Programa de Comunidad Wikipedia de Argentina ) 

Camille Françoise (Apoyos de Comunidad-IFLA ) 

Con las intervenciones de

Isela Mo Amavet, Oficina Regional de IFLA para América Latina y el Caribe

Angélica Fuentes, Presidenta de la Sección de América Latina y el Caribe-IFLA LAC

 

Fecha: viernes 29 de mayo de 2020.

Hora: 13:00 horas (Montevideo, Uruguay).

Otros horarios: consulta este enlace.

Duración: Una hora.

A desarrollarse en el Canal de YouTube de IFLA LAC

En redes sociales: usa # 1bib1ref y # 1lib1ref

Más información, clic aquí 

 

Celebrating Africa Day 2020

Mon, 25/05/2020 - 15:16

IFLA is celebrating Africa Day 2020, highlighting the contribution that Africa's libraries make to the continent's development, as well as highlighting the ideas, resources and insights available on the IFLA website thanks to the work of our African members. 

57 years ago, the Organisation for African Unity – the forerunner of today’s African Union – was created, marking a new drive to promote peace, integration and a truly African approach to the continent’s future.

This desire to work together to find ways forwards that truly reflect the strengths and needs of Africa is as strong as ever today, not least in the library field, whose role in promoting literacy, participation and development will be essential.

Increasingly, too, major continental initiatives provide opportunities for libraries, from the 2063 Agenda to the Continental Free Trade Agreement which will address copyright in its next round – a key issue for libraries, given that much legislation on the continent is outdated and does not allow for cross-border cooperation.

As part of IFLA’s Strategy 2019-24, there is therefore a new emphasis on supporting work at the regional level, and ensuring that it is possible to develop programmes of work and dialogue shaped around African priorities. We are looking forward to making a reality of this goal in the coming months and years.

In the meanwhile, here are six ideas for how to find out more about IFLA’s work in Africa:

1. Celebrate IFLA’s members in Africa: by being a part of IFLA, they are able to bring the benefits of membership to the African library field. IFLA has over 100 members in African countries with a combined population of over 1 billion people!

2. Read the speech given by IFLA Secretary-General Gerald Leitner at the most recent Round Table of Ministers Responsible for Public Libraries, organised by African Library and Information Associations and Institutions (AfLIA), and held in Accra, Ghana, last year. The speech highlights the role that libraries can play in the efforts of African governments to achieve both the African Union 2063 Agenda, and the United Nations 2030 Agenda.

3. Find data about Africa’s libraries on IFLA’s Library Map of the World! For example, did you know that there are almost 111 000 libraries in Africa – that’s one for every 7 265 people for the countries for which we have data! Nigeria has the most academic libraries (815), and South Africa the most public libraries (1876). Kenya has the most overall, at nearly 50 000, including school libraries.

4. Read our SDG Stories from Africa – we have great examples of the difference libraries are making in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa and Tunisia, . You can also find out more about the library fields in Ghana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe on our country pages.

5. Read about all the ideas submitted to IFLA’s Ideas Store from Africa! There are great suggestions on how to advocate more effectively, how to support the development of collections, how to work best together. Take a look – and submit your own! In addition, in our Global Vision report, you can see how African respondents viewed the strengths and opportunities of libraries in the biggest survey ever organised by IFLA.

6. Check out the papers from the sessions run by IFLA’s Africa Section over the past few years at the World Library and Information Congress in the IFLA Library. You can find out more on the Africa Section webpages, including how to sign up to the mailing list.

7. Get involved in the second 2020 edition of #1Lib1Ref, the campaign organised every year by the Wikimedia Foundation to work with librarians, drawing on their skills to make Wikipedia a more reliable, representative source of free information - check our social media for more.

Find out about the work of IFLA's Africa Section.

IFLA’s Members in favour of stronger involvement in decision making

Tue, 19/05/2020 - 12:27

IFLA’s members have offered overwhelming support via a consultative ballot to changes to the way that our Federation takes major decisions. At IFLA’s 2020 General Assembly, Members will be invited to confirm these changes, a key step further in IFLA’s Governance Review.

Following the approval of IFLA’s Strategy in August 2019, the goal of the Governance Review is to ensure that IFLA has the structures it needs to deliver on its plans, effectively, efficiently and inclusively. The review is the indispensable next step in IFLA’s Development Roadmap.

Through discussions so far, it has been clear that any changes to be made will inevitably require an update to IFLA’s Statutes. This requires the agreement of our Members. However, under IFLA’s current rules, any decision to update the Statutes is not taken by IFLA’s membership as a whole, but rather only by those Members represented at the General Assembly at WLIC.

This means that those who cannot attend WLIC can only have a consultative role through a prior online or postal ballot whose result does not need to be respected. This is contrary to the spirit of our governance review and the global involvement of IFLA’s members.

In order to correct this situation, ahead of crucial votes on our Federation’s new governance structures, IFLA’s Governing Board agreed on draft amendments to the Statutes.

These proposed the changes necessary to ensure that resolutions on important issues can be decided either by meetings of the General Assembly or by all Members through a postal or electronic ballot. The proposals would allow for faster decision-making and ensure that the voices of all Members can genuinely be heard, regardless of their ability to attend a General Assembly or identify a representative.

In March, IFLA therefore sent out a consultative ballot to all IFLA voting members in March asking the question: Do you approve the proposed changes to the IFLA Statutes which aim to ensure that when taking key decisions in future, the voice of every member counts?

The ballot closed after eight weeks on Thursday 7 May. We received votes from Members in all IFLA regions and Member categories, a representative result for our global organisation. The result was an overwhelming yes, with 98% of Members in favour of the proposed changes.

This will inform a binding vote be taken at IFLA’s General Assembly 2020, which will be rearranged for later this year. If the vote passes, IFLA will be set to ensure more effective and efficient Member involvement in crucial upcoming decisions on the future of our Federation.

In the meanwhile, IFLA's Governing Board has continued its work to define potential new structures for our Federation. Workshops held online over two days allowed for useful progress towards solutions that would reflect the same goals of achieving maximum effectiveness in our work globally and opportunities for all of the field to engage.

A consultation on these ideas will open in June in order to make sure that these proposals best reflect the views of our Members and volunteers. We look forward to working with you to continue IFLA's transformation.

Gerald Leitner
IFLA Secretary General

SIG Library History 2020 update

Sun, 17/05/2020 - 11:01

The SIG Library History was so looking forward to its session at the IFLA 2020 Dublin conference which as we all know was eventually cancelled. The SIG’s “Committee” continues to progress its thoughts on its series of projects on oral histories of the world's librarians, as well as watching the planning for WLIC 2021 in Rotterdam and the SIG’s potential session at it and we will keep you informed.

Dr Kerry Smith, FALIA, AM

Convenor IFLA Library History SIG

 

Library History SIG 2020 update

Sun, 17/05/2020 - 11:01

The SIG Library History was so looking forward to its session at the IFLA 2020 Dublin conference which as we all know was eventually cancelled. The SIG’s “Committee” continues to progress its thoughts on its series of projects on oral histories of the world's librarians, as well as watching the planning for WLIC 2021 in Rotterdam and the SIG’s potential session at it and we will keep you informed.

Dr Kerry Smith, FALIA, AM

Convenor IFLA Library History SIG

 

Out Now: March 2020 issue of IFLA Journal

Wed, 13/05/2020 - 16:11

​​IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries.

The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.

Volume 46, No.1 (March 2020)

Special Issue: Knowledge Management and library innovation in a changing world

Guest Editors: Leda Bultrini and Wilda Newman

Contents:
Editorial

Knowledge management and library innovation in a changing world 3
Leda Bultrini and Wilda Newman

Articles

From information, to data, to knowledge – Digital Scholarship Centers: An emerging transdisciplinary digital knowledge and research methods integrator in academic and research libraries 5
Zheng (John) Wang and Xuemao Wang

Innovative application of knowledge management in organizational restructuring of academic libraries: A case study of Peking University Library 15
Long Xiao

Knowledge management in practice in academic libraries 25
Sandra Shropshire, Jenny Lynne Semenza and Regina Koury

Problems of knowledge management practices in libraries and information centres of Bangladesh 34
Md Nazmul Islam, Md Shariful Islam and Abdur Razzak

City library network knowledge management for social cohesion: The case of Santa Coloma de Gramenet, Barcelona, Spain 52
Daniel García Jiménez and Lluis Soler Alsina

Determining the impact of knowledge sharing initiatives in international organizations: Case studies 64
Linda Stoddart

The Organizational Trap-Gap Framework: A conceptual view of library dysfunction 72
Spencer Acadia

Abstracts 88

 

IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally. IFLA Journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

To submit an article please visit IFLA Journal on the SAGE platform.

Sign up for Email Alerts from Sage!

IFLA General Assembly 2020

Wed, 13/05/2020 - 11:38

While the World Library and Information Congress will not be taking place this year, IFLA still plans to hold its General Assembly, in line with its statutes, later this year. In a message to IFLA Members, IFLA Secretary General Gerald Leitner set out next steps towards defining a date.

As you will know, WLIC 2020, due to be held in Dublin, has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic which is affecting countries across the world.  As a consequence, this year’s General Assembly, which would normally have been held during WLIC, will need to be re-arranged.

In accordance with Motion 11.1, which was approved at the General Assembly held in Athens on Wednesday 28 August 2019, “In the case of an unavoidable delay the General Assembly may be convened at a later date, but no later than 30 November 2020”.

You will be aware that the current situation regarding COVID-19 is still very fluid. Travel restrictions and levels of risk to health vary from country to country, and change very frequently.  The Governing Board, who are responsible for setting the date of the General Assembly, are regularly monitoring the situation. 

Reflecting this, they will make a decision on the rescheduling of the General Assembly, and will share this with Members no later than the first half of July 2020.

As a consequence, the closing date for items to be submitted for inclusion in the agenda of the General Assembly – previously set for 11 May – will be extended.  The new closing date for these items will be announced at the same time as the date of the rescheduled General Assembly, giving a final opportunity to submit items

Shortly after the closing date for motions the formal Convening Notice for the General Assembly will be issued, giving three months’ notice of the meeting.  The notice will include the agenda alongside the rules and provisions on proxy voting for those unable to attend in person.

 

Gerald Leitner

IFLA Secretary General

IFLA General Assembly 2020

Wed, 13/05/2020 - 11:38

While the World Library and Information Congress will not be taking place this year, IFLA still plans to hold its General Assembly, in line with its statutes, later this year. In a message to IFLA Members, IFLA Secretary General Gerald Leitner set out next steps towards defining a date.

As you will know, WLIC 2020, due to be held in Dublin, has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic which is affecting countries across the world.  As a consequence, this year’s General Assembly, which would normally have been held during WLIC, will need to be re-arranged.

In accordance with Motion 11.1, which was approved at the General Assembly held in Athens on Wednesday 28 August 2019, “In the case of an unavoidable delay the General Assembly may be convened at a later date, but no later than 30 November 2020”.

You will be aware that the current situation regarding COVID-19 is still very fluid. Travel restrictions and levels of risk to health vary from country to country, and change very frequently.  The Governing Board, who are responsible for setting the date of the General Assembly, are regularly monitoring the situation. 

Reflecting this, they will make a decision on the rescheduling of the General Assembly, and will share this with Members no later than the first half of July 2020.

As a consequence, the closing date for items to be submitted for inclusion in the agenda of the General Assembly – previously set for 11 May – will be extended.  The new closing date for these items will be announced at the same time as the date of the rescheduled General Assembly, giving a final opportunity to submit items

Shortly after the closing date for motions the formal Convening Notice for the General Assembly will be issued, giving three months’ notice of the meeting.  The notice will include the agenda alongside the rules and provisions on proxy voting for those unable to attend in person.

 

Gerald Leitner

IFLA Secretary General

#IFLAFromHome: Engaging with IFLA, Wherever You Are

Tue, 12/05/2020 - 15:21

The COVID-19 Pandemic has seen so much energy and inventiveness from libraries as they work to continue to fulfil their missions. In line with our Strategy, IFLA in turn is working hard to support its members. With our new #IFLAFromHome series, will be sharing tools, ideas and resources so you can benefit from being part of a strong and united global library field.

With libraries around the world obliged to close their doors for the safety of both users and staff, the last weeks have seen a major shift towards providing services at distance.  Library and information workers have shown both resilience and creativity in finding ways to ensure that their communities can benefit from services at home.

From greater investment in electronic content to distributing computers and WiFi hotspots, and activities such as online storytimes and public debates, libraries have shown themselves more than ready to face and overcome challenges.

IFLA too has been affected by the pandemic, with the World Library and Information Congress – the most international event in the library calendar – not taking place for the first time in 74 years.

However, despite the disappointment of not being able to meet in person in August, the good news is that IFLA is open all-year-round, bringing benefits to our Members and the profession and providing opportunities for engagement.

Through the work of our Professional Units and Headquarters team, and guided by our Strategy, we are always working to provide opportunities to share, learn and develop, as well as to advocate for libraries at all levels. There are so many tools, ideas and resources that you can draw on, including from home.  

In order to highlight all of these possibilities, we are therefore launching #IFLAFromHome. Under this banner, we will share ideas and resources through social media and e-mail that help you to get involved in IFLA.

IFLA’s Secretary General Gerald Leitner, said: ‘IFLA is committed to inspiring, engaging, enabling and connecting the global library field, even in difficult times. With new and exciting initiatives on the way to deliver our Strategy, building on the wealth of materials IFLA has already produced, it’s easy to make the most of IFLA from home.

Look out for tools and materials on how you can help implement the IFLA Strategy, ideas on how to get involved in the global field, memories of past Congresses, and tools and other reports that can help you in your work! Simply keep an eye on our social media (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram), follow the hashtags #WeAreIFLA and #IFLAStrategy, or wait for update e-mails through our IFLA-L mailing list

Two new E4GDH resource guides: Finding the Evidence (Spanish) & Multilanguage tools for evidence based practice

Fri, 08/05/2020 - 14:24

We are pleased to announce our guide to resources for Global and Disaster Health is now available in Spanish, and we have a new guide on Multilanguage tools for evidence based practice. 

Our new guide on Multilanguage tools for evidence based practice contains a range of Multilanguage tools to support cross-working and overcome language barriers in global and disaster health.

This guide complements our Finding the Evidence for Global and Disaster Health guide now in English and Spanish.

Suggestions for additional resources are welcome, and will be considered for future updates. Please send these to E4GDHteam@gmail.com.

A New Model for Digital Inclusion: An Interview with Helsingborg City Libraries

Thu, 07/05/2020 - 17:13

The long-standing mission of libraries to promote equitable access to information often leads them to get involved in digital inclusion efforts. We talked to Catharina Isberg, Library Director, and Eva Hveem, Librarian, Helsingborg City Libraries to find out about their experience of working with a European Union programme on the subject.

Helsingborg City Libraries is part of European Union programme, Urban Agenda Digital Transition. One of the results of this work is a published booklet on how to set up a digital competence centre. The two models on this are Helsingborg, Sweden and Sofia, Bulgaria.

We asked Catharina and Eva for more

 

1. How did you first get involved in this project?

The city of Helsingborg is developing and evolving with a growing population, new city districts and changed social structures. Work on smart cities, with a vision of being one of the most innovative cities in Europe and taking advantage of the possibilities of digitalisation are important parts of all of the work of the city.

The city library is working intensively, developing and changing its operations to continue to be in line with the ambitions of the city as well as to better serve today’s society and continue to be relevant in the future.

Helsingborg public library continuously strives to get more people digitally included by providing access to digital information and technology with the added service of supervision and training by the library staff if needed.

On an operational level, in 2015 the library implemented a new organisational structure including a specific department responsible for the digital inclusion.  On a strategic level, the library cooperates with other departments to increase the digital skills of citizens, reduce the digital divide and develop access to the digital arena. With regard to this ambition, a Digidel Center was opened at the Helsingborg City Library in February 2018 in collaboration with the city's digitalisation department.

As a spin off from this intensive work, the library was asked to get involved in the European Union project Urban Agenda Digital Transition. The library was one of three city departments involved in this work. This shows the impact of the long-term strategic work which had been carried out within the city, which had built greater awareness of the relevance of the library’s work.

 

2. The project works on the assumption that simply having access to the internet isn’t enough for people to benefit from it fully. Why is this?

There are four steps in including citizens digitally: motivation, access, skills and use, where motivation is the fundamental factor for digital participation.

It is clear that technical knowledge does not equal digital inclusion. There are so many different knowledge areas one has to master to benefit fully from digitalisation. Becoming digitally included is a multi-step, ongoing and lifelong process.

That´s why it is important to offer support for existing and new training as well as retraining programs for the citizens. A Digital Centre combined with training offers and tutorial guidance approach, can accomplish just that.

 

3. What was your experience as a library in helping users build skills and confidence previously?

Before we started the Digidel Centre project, the library participated in a service design project, “Customer journey mapping” where we interviewed our visitors in depth using our public technology and came up with a number of important insights, e.g. “Those who come to us have nowhere else to go”. We found, in particular, that once at the library, users often need to do private, sensitive tasks on our computers.

As the authorities become even more digital and shut down physical offices, the number of cases / problems we help with has increased and widened in recent years. We get a wide variety of questions and issues every day.

 

4. How did participating in the project – in particular alongside Sofia, Bulgaria – change your views?

Helsingborg City Library joined the partnership in the spring of 2018.

Working alongside colleges from other countries with a similar agenda has been educational and has heightened the awareness of the problems we face.

Primarily, the huge need for digital inclusion and the lack of basic digital skills overall in the EU were highlighted. Over 43% of the population in the EU aged 16-74 are digitally excluded or does not have enough or the right digital knowledge to take up the jobs that exist today.

This means that almost half of the European population is missing out on learning opportunities brought about by the digital transformation. 

Whilst working on the partnership and setting up and running our pilots we were able to do a lot of knowledge sharing leading up to the final result. It really was a team effort.

 

5. How do you hope the model and toolbox could help others? 

The idea with the model is that it should be as general as possible so that everyone can take it and change it based on the needs and conditions of their country, region or city. There are already a lot of good projects and initiatives around Europe and the world, but most of them are aimed at a specific target group.

Our aim was to make our model as general as possible to avoid unnecessary limitations. The model is applicable to various conditions and should be seen as one starting point and reference to start up a Digital Centre.

 

6. What options are there, in particular, for libraries with fewer available resources?

They can always start up small and build over time. It is important to build a sustainable operation that will last. A good idea is to involve the whole community and municipality, to collaborate with others since digital inclusion is the entire municipality's responsibility and not that of the libraries.  It is also important to offer the services to all citizens in the municipality and not only specific target groups.

 

7. In what way do activities such as this project fit in with the IFLA Strategy?

As we see it the work is in line with all four Strategic Directions of the IFLA Strategy:

1. Strengthen the Global Voice of Libraries

2. Inspire and Enhance Professional Practice

3. Connect and Empower the Field

4. Optimise our Organisation

All four areas are constantly in our mind when developing our business. Our focus is of course on the benefits to the citizens of Helsingborg, but we constantly exchange ideas with other libraries to learn together and to continue to stay relevant.

In particular, Key Initiative 2.3 “Develop standards, guidelines, and other materials that foster best professional practice” is being realised by this project.

By meeting demands in a number of different projects and ways, we continue to develop our work to ensure a good library service for both today's and tomorrow's residents.

 

Catharina Isberg, Library Director, Helsingborg City Libraries

Catharina Isberg is the Library Director of Helsingborg City Libraries since 2013. Catharina is actively working on developing the library services to best meet the need of the community on both local, regional, national and international level. Since 2011 Catharina is active in IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations) and is from 2019 Division Chair and an IFLA Governing Board member.

 

Eva Hveem, Librarian, Helsingborg City Libraries

Eva Hveem is a librarian with a large focus on digital inclusion and digital skills, she sees VR, AR and 3D as a part of the library’s mission within education. She is also active on the regional, national and European arena within different projects. Eva Hveem is an active member of the Urban Agenda for the EU Digital Transition Partnership, responsible for implementing Action 2.

WIPO's General Assembly: Fifty-second session

Thu, 07/05/2020 - 09:00

Today and tomorrow, the World Intellectual Property Organization will hold an extraordinary General Assembly, thorugh a written procedure in order to confirm the appointment of a new Director General, Mr Daren Tang of Singapore.

The World Intellectual Property Organization is the agency of the United Nations that oversees policies and decisions concerning intellectual property and in particular copyright and related rights, through its Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR).

The fifty-second General Assembly of the World Intellectual Property Organization is taking place on 7th and 8th May 2020.

This Extraordinary General Assembly (the 28th) will see the appointment of the new Director-General, Daren Tang, currently CEO of the Intellectual Property Office of Singapore.

IFLA has already welcomed Mr.Tang's nomination, appreciating his strong role in the Singapore office and the implementation of its copyright reform, which demonstrates the use of solid legal and economic evidence to promote the development of a balance between the interests of users and rights holders.

IFLA has also noted contributions of Mr Tang during his time as chair of the SCCR, especially his underlining of the need to find digital-ready, cross-border solutions for cultural heritage, education and other uses.

IFLA has submitted a statement to WIPO as contribution, prepared by Winston Tabb (Head of IFLA's delegation) and Camille Françoise, Policy and Research Officer.

The statement is available: English version.

IFLA Responds to UN Consultation on Cultural Rights and Climate Change

Wed, 06/05/2020 - 15:04

The UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights invited stakeholders, including IFLA, to provide input for a report on the threat of climate change to culture, heritage and cultural rights.

These include the right to take part in cultural life without discrimination, scientific and artistic freedom, and the preservation of and access to cultural heritage. Beyond this, the report seeks to explore the positive potential of culture, heritage, and traditional knowledge on counteracting the effect of climate change and adapting to its impacts.

Climate action is a topic that transcends areas of study. Its intersection with cultural heritage is a priority for IFLA, from our participation as a founding member of the Climate Heritage Network to the important work being done in our Professional Units, such as the ENSULIB Special Interest Group.

To assist the Special Rapporteur in preparing her report, IFLA provided input on multiple questions within the following areas:

  • Negative impacts of climate change on culture and cultural rights
  • Positive potential of culture and cultural rights to enhance responses to climate change
  • Measures taken and recommendations
The Threat to Documentary Heritage

Documentary heritage gives us access to information, such as climate records and descriptions of traditional practices. This heritage, as well as the professionals that preserve and share it, are assets for climate action

We highlighted the threat to delicate documentary heritage collections posed by flooding, power-loss, smoke damage and other climate-related risks. In doing so, we also stressed the need to address gaps in capacity for disaster risk reduction and recovery in least developed and developing nations, including small island states.

Furthermore, the institutions that safeguard it, and in particular libraries, also have key roles in promoting, literacy, both traditional and digital, which is key to informed, participatory societies, which necessary for action on all SDGs.

In our response, it was therefore our goal to ensure that documentary heritage continues to be included in this discussion, both in terms of the negative impact climate change can have on its preservation and accessibility, as well as its potential to aid climate action.

Building Capacity

We also emphasized work already completed or underway at IFLA that could help build this capacity, including the IFLA Register for Documentary Heritage at Risk, the 2015 Recommendation Checklist, and guidelines concerning digital unification, disaster risk reduction, and library services to refugees.

Furthermore, we touched on the need to address the remaining digital divide to promote equitable participation in cultural life through online platforms.

Copyright for Heritage Preservation 

Finally, we voiced our concern for the lack of international legal provisions for heritage preservation, which leaves collections – and the cultural rights they help deliver – highly vulnerable to threats from climate change. For immediate action, we recommend stakeholders request an international copyright legal instrument with clear rules allowing the preservation copying of collections using all relevant technologies, including through cross-border collaboration.

We closed with a strong recommendation:

Start documenting threatened heritage sites and collections now, invest in disaster risk reduction measures and enable the digitisation of documentary heritage, or else they could be at risk for being lost forever.

The input provided by IFLA and other stakeholders will be included in a report and presented at the United Nations Human Rights Council in October 2020.

 

April-May IFLA Governing Board Meetings: Update from the IFLA President

Wed, 06/05/2020 - 11:33

Dear colleagues,

I hope that you are well, despite all that is happening in the world at the moment. So many of you are facing tough restrictions alongside the communities you serve, and yet you are finding innovative and effective ways to continue to provide access to information and culture.

I know also that many of us have faced disappointments, with projects and events cancelled, not least our own World Library and Information Congress in August. However, we are lucky to have more options than ever before to meet remotely, and continue the work of IFLA, even in these extraordinary times.

This is exactly what we did with IFLA’s Governing Board meetings, held over the last week and a half. Despite having members from eight different time zones covering a total of 17 hours, we managed to get our business done and discuss our ongoing projects. Hooray Zoom!

Here is an overview of what we discussed at the GB meeting:

The Governance Review, which aims to give IFLA the structures it needs in order to make IFLA more transparent, effective, and open to all. The working groups have continued to meet and we will hold a virtual workshop next week to move towards finalising the draft proposal that will be circulated for consultation with members and professional units in June. We also discussed the timeframe for the amendments to the IFLA Statutes and Rules of Procedure and nominations and voting for 2021-23.

The General Assembly, which clearly cannot take place as planned in August. Given the uncertainty we face around the lifting of travel restrictions, the Governing Board agreed to leave taking a decision on the date and modalities of the Assembly until the first half of July. The business of the General Assembly includes the presentation of the Annual Report and awarding of IFLA honours as well as the amendments to the Statutes.

We discussed future World Library and Information Congresses, including the kindness of our Irish hosts in welcoming WLIC in 2022 and updates on the preparations for Rotterdam in 2021. We also agreed that we will delay a call for candidates to host the 2023 congress until later in the year because response to the COVID-19 pandemic is clearly the priority for most at this time.

This year’s President’s Meeting cannot be held as it has before. But we have some exciting plans developing, so that we can share useful and interesting perspectives on key issues relevant to the work of libraries now in the future.  

The new edition of the Trend Report has been impacted significantly because of COVID-19. We are exploring ways to produce this now that face to face meetings are not possible. The Governing Board agreed that we are still committed to having it completed by the end of the year.

Other meetings were also held during the week – the Executive Committee, the Finance Committee, the Congress Advisory Committee and the Professional Committee. The Professional committee discussed the imminent launch of new tools for IFLA webinars, which we hope will be particularly useful for Professional Units to share information and knowledge in a year without WLIC.

And here’s a video where I talk about the meeting.

In the meanwhile, please do keep an eye on our website and social media, where you’ll find plenty of news and resources to help you in your work and advocacy.

Warm wishes to you all,

Christine Mackenzie
IFLA President 2019-2021