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Updated: 5 საათი 12 წუთი-ს წინ

Former IFLA Secretary General Peter Lor shares insights from his new book

6 საათი 17 წუთი წინ

During the 85th IFLA World Library and Information Congress 2019 in Athens, Greece, several recent and forthcoming IFLA publications were presented by their authors and editors at the IFLA / De Gruyter Publication Series session. One of the books presented was Peter Lor’s International and Comparative Librarianship: Concepts and Methods for Global Studies. We sat down with him for a short interview on his work.

Peter Lor has been active in the LIS field since the 1960s and served as South Africa's first National Librarian, as well as IFLA Secretary General from 2005 – 2008.

His new book, the result of years of research, has a number of aims, including: to provide the first systematic overview of the field of international and comparative librarianship, to raise awareness of theory in other disciplines that can be applied in international and comparative librarianship, and to improve research in the field.  But also a more personal one:

   

My interest in international and comparative librarianship has a moral dimension. I believe that libraries and information agencies have a role in promoting international understanding, tolerance, and peace. I hope that this book can contribute to that.

The book also includes a conceptual framework and methodological guidelines for the field and covers the full range of international relations among libraries and information services. Particular attention is given to the international political economy of information, the international diffusion of innovations and policy in library and information services, and LIS development and international aid.  

Lor’s new book is part of the IFLA Global Studies in Libraries and Information Series, published in partnership with De Gruyter.

E-Lending, Embargoes and Equitable Access: Interview with Sari Feldman

ოთხ, 16/10/2019 - 13:34

The rules around library eLending are on the agenda again in the United States, following the decision by one publisher to impose limits on libraries' ability to give access to new books.

We interviewed Sari Feldman, past President of the American Library Association and currently a Senior Policy Fellow focusing on eBooks, about the situation.

1. Can you briefly explain the change in how Macmillan is working that has triggered this effort?

Many of the major publishers, referred to in the US as the Big 5, have changed or altered the terms of their eBook pricing and license agreement.  Macmillan is proposing that beginning November 1 they will decrease the price to $30 for a single initial copy of an eBook, which comes with perpetual access. But it will be ONLY after an eight-week embargo period that a library can purchase additional copies.  Those additional copies will be available for $60 per copy for a two year license.  Libraries are objecting to the embargo that denies equitable access to and use of eBooks.

 

2. Is Macmillan alone in doing this?

Macmillan is the only one of the Big 5 publishers with an embargo. Blackstone Audio, a distributer of digital audio, has embargoed selected new release audiobooks  for 90 days and Amazon has a permanent embargo on all original eBooks and Audible audio content.

 

3. Do you expect other publishers to follow suit?

We believe that it is important to have a clear and strong message opposing embargoes.  We do not believe, however, that other Big 5 publishers are considering a business model that includes an embargo.

 

4. What impact does this have on readers?

Limiting access to new titles for libraries means limiting access for readers most dependent on libraries, including people with the fewest resources to purchase new eBoooks on demand, people with disabilities, students and researchers needing easy access to review content from a variety of sources, and readers with limited access to library locations.  Macmillan is restricting equitable access and suppressing the ability of readers to discover new titles and authors through the library.

 

5. Where is the evidence of eLending harming sales or otherwise?

We have not seen data that supports Macmillan’s position.  Libraries pay for books and we do not believe that we suppress business growth for publishers or authors.  Public libraries alone spend more than $1.3 billion on their collection.  Ebook prices are extremely high for libraries and libraries often pay up to five times the retail price per title. Moreover, there is much less discussion about how libraries increase sales through many activities that are effectively free marketing for authors and their works.

 

6. Why does it matter so much that there is no embargo?

Libraries are critical to building readership at a time when reading is on the decline in the US.  Libraries promote literacy and reading for all ages.  Readers are attracted to eBooks and if libraries cannot get the content in the quantity needed to satisfy readers, excessive wait time will supress discovery and interest in eBooks.

 

7. How well does the licensing offer from publishers work for libraries?

Libraries are concerned about many aspects of publisher business models.  While limited term licensing is growing in popularity among the Big 5 publishers, libraries recognize that this model impacts affordability of content and the cost of managing collections when titles must be repurchased to maintain a backlist of author works.  Limited term licensing also impacts the preservation and archiving of digital content and the ability of libraries to maintain rich retrospective collections.

 

8. Is the current model of eBook lending in general sustainable?

We believe that the current models could be refined and result in a business plan that is more sustainable and more satisfying to all parties; publishers, authors and libraries.

We hope that there is an opportunity to come to the table and to design a better approach to eBook collections and the reading ecosystem.

 

9. What role do you see libraries playing in the eBook chain? Does this differ from the role they play in the traditional book chain?

Public libraries represent more than 16,000 essential outlets in communities across the nation.  While book stores are also important to building readership in communities and libraries work collaboratively with community bookstores, bookstores do not have nearly the penetration in the US and many communities do not have any bookstores. 

Libraries are critical to building and sustaining readership, creating discovery of new and midlist authors, and providing equitable access to readers most dependent on libraries.  Readers in remote locations,  those with the fewest resources and those with disabilities as mentioned previously rely on libraries for reading material.  Librarians are trained to provide readers advisory services and to support readers of all ages.  Equitable access is one of the core values of public libraries and must be preserved in the digital age.

 

10. What scenarios do you see for library eBook lending in 10 years? What will this mean for readers?

I believe that there is so much good will between libraries and publishers that we will weather this current challenge with Macmillan.  Publishers and libraries have the common goal of building and sustaining readers and authors are extremely supportive of and interested in having their books in libraries and receiving promotion through librarians, library social media and library programs. I truly believe that these efforts will help us to achieve new business models that will balance the cost-benefit between libraries and publishers and will help to not only sustain but to build the eBook industry.

 

Click in the image below for more details about ALA's #eBooksForAll campaign and how you can get involved:

Read more about IFLA's work around eLending.

Global Media and Information Literacy Week 2019, Worldwide, 24-31 October

ორშ, 14/10/2019 - 19:09

Global Media and Information Literacy (MIL) Week, commemorated annually, is a major occasion for stakeholders to review and celebrate the progress achieved towards “MIL for All”.

UNESCO and GAPMIL are calling partners all over the world to promote Global MIL Week. Together with its Feature Events (International MIL and Intercultural Dialogue Conference and Youth Agenda Forum), Global MIL Week calls for local events around the world to promote MIL connections across disciplines and professions. 

An Alternative Route: Cooperation Leads to Better Conditions for Australian Libraries

ორშ, 14/10/2019 - 12:50

A lot of advocacy work focuses on trying to change laws in order to improve the situation for libraries. However, there can be alterantives to legal reform as a recent example from Australia shows.

IFLA interviewed Sue McKerracher, CEO of the Australian Library and Information Association to find out more.

 

1. You’ve just announced two agreements – what do these cover?

The first addresses the grey area of copyright permission for storytimes held outside the library premises. Lots of libraries take storytime to festivals, community centres, neighbourhood gatherings, shopping centres – it’s a great way to reach out to families who may not have thought of using the library before. It’s the performance of 100% of an artistic work in a public space that’s not a library but authors and illustrators love the fact that their picture books gain this exposure, and publishers welcome the additional promotion, so we are all in agreement that it’s a very positive thing for the book industry.

The second agreement is one we like to call the Jolly Postman agreement, after the 1986 book The Jolly Postman or Other People’s Letters by Janet and Allan Ahlberg. This agreement allows libraries to photocopy the removable inserts in activity picture books, so when (it’s always ‘when’, not ‘if’) they are lost by a junior member, the library can simply cut out new shapes for the next borrower. Again, there is no issue for creators or publishers. It’s in everyone’s interest that children can find full enjoyment in the picture book.

 

2. What will they mean for libraries in practical terms?

For storytimes, this simply takes away any doubt librarians may have had about whether events outside libraries were covered or not by existing copyright provisions. There will be little effect in practice, as libraries have regularly used storytimes as a fun form of outreach. With the Jolly Postman agreement, it may well mean that libraries which previously avoided purchasing picture books with inserts, these books will now be added to the acquisitions list.

 

3. Is there any precedent for these agreements?

This is the third agreement we have reached with Australian book industry partners. The first was in August 2016 when we agreed that libraries could use book cover images to promote books and authors without seeking special permission each time. Again, it was a commonsense approach to regularise something which benefited everyone.

 

4. Who has been involved, and what brought you together in order try and find a deal?

These initiatives have been made possible through strong and positive relationships between publishers, authors, booksellers and libraries. Our peak bodies have been meeting regularly since 2015 with the aim of finding ways to champion Australian writing, share insights and data, and generally promote books and reading.

 

5. Did you ever consider trying to follow a legal route in order to get results here?

Through the Australian Libraries Copyright Committee, we have achieved legislative reform in other areas, for example the same terms of copyright for published and unpublished works in 2017, and safe harbours in 2018, but when there are opportunities for simple industry agreements that are of mutual benefit to all parties, it’s a quick and easy way to solve relatively minor issues.

 

6. What was the hardest part of the conversations?

The word ‘copyright’. Content creators, publishers and libraries are so used to being adversaries in the copyright arena, that it took a little while for us to work through which areas of copyright we should put to one side, as we have different perspectives, and which ones we could bring to the table.

 

7. Have you seen any changes in attitudes or levels of understanding on each side?

The Australian Publishers Association and Australian Society of Authors were great to work with once we had identified the no-go areas – and I hope they would say the same about us. We meet two or three times a year now, and between us we run the highly success Australian Reading Hour in September each year. Another great example of collaboration for the benefit of all stakeholders.

 

8. How will it be possible to guarantee that the agreements will be followed?

The Australian Publishers Association covers almost all publishers operating in this country – and in any case, these agreements work for everyone, so there is no reason why someone wouldn’t honour them.

 

9. What do you think this means for future cooperation?

These agreements are part of a wider commitment to collaborate. They provide useful practical outcomes that demonstrate this unity of purpose to government and our members.

 

10. To what extent do you think that this experience is replicable in other jurisdictions?

We would urge libraries in any country to talk to their publishers, authors and booksellers, to see if they can work through those minor copyright irritations and come up with a better way forward for everyone. Where there is mutual and equal benefit, why wouldn’t it work?

Libraries Defending and Delivering on Fundamental Rights in Croatia and the United States

სამ, 08/10/2019 - 12:51

IFLA has worked with FAIFE committee members from Croatia and the United States to prepare submissions for the Universal Periodic Reviews organised by the UN Human Rights Council.

Universal Periodic Reviews (UPR) evaluate the human rights situation in UN Member States every 5 years, track changes and issue recommendations based on these assessments.

Stakeholder input plays a crucial role in this process, and interested parties can get involved by sending in information about important human rights developments in their fields. Their contributions are summarised in a stakeholder report - one of the key outcome documents of a UPR.

IFLA submissions to the UPRs in Croatia and the United States outline the experiences of libraries protecting and promoting human rights in their countries. They mark their achievements, discuss the opportunities and highlight the challenges that libraries face.

We sincerely thank Davorka Pšenica and Laurie Bridges for their work in collecting information and developing these submissions.

Croatia

IFLA’s submission for Croatia highlights the work of libraries to ensure better access to information – an integral part of intellectual freedom rights – for persons with disabilities and children in vulnerable situations; from bibliobuses to publishing books in accessible formats.

They also help to realise the educational and cultural rights of ethnic and linguistic minorities – for example, through a network of Central Minority Libraries, or by organising informal learning opportunities for Roma youth.

Read IFLA’s submission for the Universal Periodic Review in Croatia: [PDF - English]

United States of America

In its contribution focusing on the United States, IFLA highlights the work of American libraries to come up with new ways to bridge the digital divide, helping people realise their rights to education and access to information. Furthermore, a growing number of libraries have decided to abolish or limit overdue fees to expand access to knowledge and information, given the evidence of their potential negative effect on some groups.

Libraries are also taking on many roles which help promote people’s rights to health and access to public services: helping their users find medical or insurance information online, offering tax help, or collaborating with social workers to protect their most vulnerable users.

Read IFLA’s submission for the Universal Periodic Review in the United States of America: [PDF - English]

Read our blog to find out more about the UPR, why it matters to libraries, and how they can get involved!
You can also read a joint submission prepared by the Italian Library Association and IFLA for the Italian UPR review in April 2019.

Guidelines in Vietnamese

ორშ, 07/10/2019 - 17:44

The School Libraries Guidelines are now available in Vietnamese. It's the 18th translation. 

Guidelines in Vietnamese

ორშ, 07/10/2019 - 17:44

The School Libraries Guidelines are now available in Vietnamese. It's the 18th translation. 

Promoting Access to Knowledge and Information: WIPO Members Affirm Role in Delivering the Sustainable Development Goals

ორშ, 07/10/2019 - 16:29

 

 

From 30 September to 9 October 2019, the General Assemblies of the World Intellectual Property Organization took place in Geneva, Switzerland. WIPO is the United Nations agency responsible for copyright, as well as other intellectual property issues.

This event provided an overview of the Organization’s achievements, strategies and plans for the coming year. IFLA was present to support the needs and priorities of libraries around the world. 

The Marrakesh Treaty

Member States welcomed progress on the Marrakesh Treaty, which now has 88 states parties. This international instrument has enabled the creation and exchange of books in accessible formats for people with visual impairments.

IFLA welcomed the work already done on the exchange platforms and the support of the Accessible Book Consortium, but noted the ongoing need to ensure that the Treaty is implemented properly. 

Preparation of the international conference on exceptions and limitations

For several years, WIPO has been working on the issue of exceptions and limitations to copyright for libraries, archives, and museums, as well as education and research.

From 18 to 19 October 2019, an international conference on exceptions and limitations to copyright will be held with a view to discussing how best to meet the needs of these institutions. We hope to enable the development of international action to enable libraries to continue their public service missions on heritage conservation, access to research and information and dissemination.

The Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) will follow the conference on exceptions and limitations. This committee examines questions of substantive law in the field of copyright and related rights, and will take decisions about next steps.

IFLA is committed to representing its members to member states, particularly on copyright laws for libraries, by promoting the importance of sustainable access to information in achieving development objectives.

Promoting Access to Knowledge and Information: WIPO Members Affirm Role in Delivering the Sustainable Development Goals

ორშ, 07/10/2019 - 16:29

 

 

From 30 September to 9 October 2019, the General Assemblies of the World Intellectual Property Organization took place in Geneva, Switzerland. WIPO is the United Nations agency responsible for copyright, as well as other intellectual property issues.

This event provided an overview of the Organization’s achievements, strategies and plans for the coming year. IFLA was present to support the needs and priorities of libraries around the world. 

The Marrakesh Treaty

Member States welcomed progress on the Marrakesh Treaty, which now has 88 states parties. This international instrument has enabled the creation and exchange of books in accessible formats for people with visual impairments.

IFLA welcomed the work already done on the exchange platforms and the support of the Accessible Book Consortium, but noted the ongoing need to ensure that the Treaty is implemented properly. 

Preparation of the international conference on exceptions and limitations

For several years, WIPO has been working on the issue of exceptions and limitations to copyright for libraries, archives, and museums, as well as education and research.

From 18 to 19 October 2019, an international conference on exceptions and limitations to copyright will be held with a view to discussing how best to meet the needs of these institutions. We hope to enable the development of international action to enable libraries to continue their public service missions on heritage conservation, access to research and information and dissemination.

The Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) will follow the conference on exceptions and limitations. This committee examines questions of substantive law in the field of copyright and related rights, and will take decisions about next steps.

IFLA is committed to representing its members to member states, particularly on copyright laws for libraries, by promoting the importance of sustainable access to information in achieving development objectives.

Now available: papers and presentations from WLIC 2019 satellite meeting

ორშ, 07/10/2019 - 15:45

Papers submitted to the Big Data satellite meeting in Frankfurt, 22 & 23 August 2019, are now availabe in the IFLA Library. The presentation slides of those, and other papers from the satellite meeting, are also available on the satellite meeting webpage. Please follow the Program link on https://sites.google.com/view/wlic2019-big-data.

Now available: papers and presentations from WLIC 2019 satellite meeting

ორშ, 07/10/2019 - 15:45

Papers submitted to the Big Data satellite meeting in Frankfurt, 22 & 23 August 2019, are now availabe in the IFLA Library. The presentation slides of those, and other papers from the satellite meeting, are also available on the satellite meeting webpage. Please follow the Program link on https://sites.google.com/view/wlic2019-big-data.

And the Winner is Oodi!

პარ, 04/10/2019 - 04:16

There was a huge buzz in the room as  finalists in the 2019 IFLA/Systematic Public Library of the Year presented their stories. In addition to learning more about the inspirational short listed finalists we were also traeted to some displays of national pride.

Thw winner, Oodi  Helsinki Central Library was a popular winner and met all of the judging criteria to a very high degree. You can read more about it from the judges comments.  

The other finalists were also highly prasied, each contributing significantly to the list of libraries that have been nominated for this Award since its inception in 2014.

The other finalists were:

Congratulations to our IFLA WLIC 2019 Attendance Grant winners!

ხუთ, 03/10/2019 - 12:06

Africa:  

Adetomiwa Basiru - Nigeria

Asia/Pacific

Fazelrabani Qazizai - Afghanistan

Latin America

Humberto Martinez Camacho - Mexico

Thank you to our sponsors: Sage and ExLibris

Recognising and Promoting Indigenous Languages in New Brunswick, Canada

სამ, 01/10/2019 - 17:51

Our latest profile of a library offering dedicated services around indigenous languages and the communities that speak them comes from Patricia Knockwood, Indigenous Services Librarian at New Brunswick Public Library Service, Canada.

New Brunswick Public Library Service (NBPLS) provides library services within the traditional territories of the Peskotomuhkati, Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik. It consists of a network of 64 public libraries, an online branch and a provincial library services-by-mail. 

New Brunswick (NB) public libraries are unique in Canada as library services are free to all residents of the province, which includes First Nations. In addition, of the 15 First Nation communities, only one is more than 20 kilometres from an existing public library.

​The Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqey-Peskotomuhkati languages are part of the Algonquian language family. As of the 2016 Census, there are 8,870 Mi’kmaq and 350 Wolastoqey-Peskotomuhkati speakers. Within the Atlantic Provinces of Canada, language revitalization efforts are being carried out done via methods like immersion programs, books published in the languages, and applications.

With the aid of our Indigenous Services librarian, NB public libraries have been incorporating Mi’kmaq and Peskotomuhkati-Wolastoqey languages into library spaces, collections and services. For example:

  • Every public library entrance has a “Kulahsikulpon Pjila’si Welcome Bienvenue” sign that features artwork by Wolastoqiyik artist Samaqani Cocahq (Natalie Sappier).
  • Public library communications respect local Indigenous peoples and languages by using their words for their people and language rather than using the colonialized names.
  • The provincial online catalogue provides a featured search to easily find materials written in Mi’kmaq and Peskotomuhkati- Wolastoqey.
  • Every public library provides access to Indigenous language materials for loan with a strong focus on Mi’kmaq and Peskotomuhkati-Wolastoqey languages. These include titles published by New Brunswick First Nation education groups.
  • Public libraries promote Indigenous language materials via social media.
  • Some public libraries have worked with their municipalities to include the local indigenous language term for welcome on the library’s exterior signage.
  • Indigenous languages are incorporated into public library programs.  Recently, the provincial Summer Reading Club program featured a main character of a lobster whose name was Jakej (pronounced ja-getch), the Mi’kmaq word for Lobster.  Other examples include:  bilingual story times, word matching games, film screenings, and basic language learning sessions for the general public.   
  • NB public libraries offer a printed brochure in Mi’kmaq and Peskotomuhkati-Wolastoqey, English and French languages.
  • Library staff have a glossary of key words (i.e. welcome, library, read, and book) in Mi’kmaq and Peskotomuhkati-Wolastoqey languages that they can use when planning activities and events.
  • Public libraries are promoting International Year of Indigenous Languages through such activities as  multilingual story times, collection displays, guest speakers, and film screenings.

NB public libraries have a strategic plan for Indigenous library services that can be accessed here. Future initiatives include promotion of language learning apps and exploring ways of further incorporating Indigenous languages into library space.

Find out more about what libraries are doing to support indigenous languages and the communities that speak them. 

Libraries Act for the SDGs

ორშ, 30/09/2019 - 17:40

​The Global Week of Action for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) comes to an end today. The week falls around the time of the anniversary of the agreement of the United Nations 2030 Agenda on 25 September 2015.

The 2019 edition has also coincided with the first United Nations General Assembly session focused on the SDGs since their agreement four years ago, as well as some relevant major international days for libraries, notably on peace (21 September) and access to information (28 September).

Libraries around the world have answered the call to show what they are doing for development.

In France, the French Libraries and the 2030 Agenda group engaged libraries across the country in an awareness raising drive. Producing cubes with each of the SDGs as a talking point, over 1300 libraries nationwide organised discussions, events and displays on the connection between libraries and the SDGs, including a visit from the Minister for Ecological and Social Transition.  

In Australia, libraries have worked from the local to the national level, succeeding in building understanding in government of their potential to deliver change. With the Asia-Pacific Sustainable Development Goals Summit last year, they took this message to the wider region. SDG Action Week was the opportunity for a round table of senior library leaders, in order to look at how the SDGs can be integrated in strategic planning for libraries.

In Canada, a community book distributor – GoodMinds.com – focused on the work it is carrying out to support the development of indigenous libraries as a key means of promoting education and equality in communities which are often at risk of disadvantage. In Egypt, the Egyptian Programme for Libraries, Information and Instructional Technology has been working to promote awareness of the SDGs in general.

These initiatives join the many others taken by libraries over the past years in order to raise awareness of the SDGs and the role of libraries in delivering them. You can find more examples on the SDG Stories page of IFLA’s Library Map of the World, as well as in the updates provided by participants in IFLA’s International Advocacy Programme.

We look forward to seeing more into the future!

See our blogs for Peace Day, the International Day for the Universal Access to Information, and the launch of the Global Sustainable Development Report.

IFLA Strategy 2019-2024 now available in seven languages

ორშ, 30/09/2019 - 15:15

Engagement by the global library field has been key to the development of the IFLA Strategy 2019-2024.  Continued and expanded contributions from the global library field will be key to its success.

IFLA bridges cultural differences across the library community and wider environment in which libraries operate in part through its commitment to multilingualism.  In this spirt, after its successful launch this past August in Athens, the IFLA Strategy 2019-2024 is now available in all seven official languages of IFLA: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Russian and Spanish.

The Strategy gives new direction to the work of IFLA’s Professional Units and Headquarters. It also provides a reference point for anyone who cares about libraries and the people they serve to reflect on their own actions and look for possibilities for alignment.

Everyone has a role in building our future, no matter the location or language. The Strategy is not only a document to be read, but to be used.  Its success will be our success, but it depends on each of us to play our part. 

Share your actions, build your connections, and spread the word!

During October 2019 we will launch a dedicated platform for submitting your actions.

We need you to reflect on what actions you’re already taking or plan on taking that contribute to the goals of the Strategy, both individually and collectively. What can you do to share its message—and to inspire and engage others—just as you have been inspired and engaged?

Together, we can build a strong and united library field, powering literate, informed and participatory societies.

If you would like to translate the Strategy into another language, please contact communications@ifla.org and we will provide you with a template.  We will add your translation to our website so that more people can develop actions to strengthen our field and achieve our vision.

Stay tuned for the actions platform launch in October!

#WeAreIFLA

Gerald Leitner
IFLA Secretary General

Culture Essential for SDG Success: IFLA Contributes to New Report

სამ, 24/09/2019 - 19:05

In the negotiations that led to the agreement of the 2030 Agenda in September 2015, a group of global organisations including IFLA drove the #culture2015goal campaign. This made the case for the recognition of – and support for – culture as a key pillar of sustainable development.

The result of this work was reference to culture as a cross-cutting factor of success, as well as inclusion in a number of individual Sustainable Development Goals.

Four years on, a new report, coordinated by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) and United Cities and Local Government (UCLG) with support from IFLA, looks at progress in ensuring the place of culture at the heart of development policies.

The report notes that cultural factors can risk being seen as secondary to the other pillars of sustainable development – the economic, social and environmental. A lack of understanding of the difference it can make – and the difficulty in measuring this in hard numbers – can limit the emphasis it is given.

However, as the report underlines, many countries have nonetheless acknowledged how cultural development can accelerate progress elsewhere, providing for new jobs and growth, stronger social cohesion, and supporting climate change adaptation and mitigation.

Through a comprehensive analysis of Voluntary National Reviews (of countries) and Voluntary Local Reviews (of cities), it highlights great examples of governments that are giving culture the attention it deserves.

The challenge now is to take this good practice, and generalise it. To do so, the report makes a number of recommendations both to the culture field itself, and to Member States.

There is a need to do more to explain the connections between culture and development, including through new indicators that demonstrate the positive relationship. At the national and local levels, cultural actors can form wider and stronger partnerships, and be better involved in Voluntary Reviews, citing the good examples that already exist.

At the global level, the report underlines that it is time for a high-level meeting on culture in order to share with leaders the difference that cultural development can make. And finally, it calls for the #culture2015goal campaign to be reinvigorated as the #culture2030goal effort. Watch this space!

Download the report in PDF: "Culture in the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda"

UN Climate Summit: the Heritage Dimension

კვი, 22/09/2019 - 11:15

IFLA attended the session at the United Nations Climate Summit focused on heritage issues. With a strong focus both on the risks that climate heritage poses to all types of culture, but also the contribution that heritage can, in turn, make to our response, it was an opportunity to highlight the difference that libraries can make.

The Climate Summit, held on 21-23 September 2019 as part of the United Nations General Assembly, has the goal of providing an update on progress in mitigating and adapting to climate change, and encouraging further commitments.

Sessions at the Summit cover a wide range of areas where action can make a contribution, from the global to the local, and from science to policy. Culture was not left out, with a session focused on the interaction between climate and heritage, led by the government of Greece and claired by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS).

The session strongly underlined the risk that the harm caused by climate change to culture was often under-appreciated. The loss of key objects, buildings or landscapes could destroy social capital. Communities forced to leave areas where they have lived for generations without being able to take their heritage and culture with them often struggle to succeed in their new environment.

This called for a new approach to ensuring resilience in the face of change, not just in terms of protecting jobs and wealth, but also the cultural factors that hold groups together. As Professor Jeffrey Sachs underlined, failure to do this could be catastrophic.  

Professor Paolo Vitti of Europa Nostra therefore strongly recommended that culture and heritage be included not only in national development plans (as required under the SDGs), but also in the national adaptation plans promised in the Paris Accords.

This would not only ensure that these cultural factors were not forgotten, but indeed increase the chance that the contributions culture can make – to resilience, to livelihoods, and to understanding climate trends – could be properly realised.

IFLA’s engagement made it possible to underline the role of documentary heritage in particular, both as a key means of transmitting ideas and imagination, but also as the basis for much of the research we have on our climate.

We look forward to continuing to engage to ensure libraries are fully involved in future efforts to put heritage at the heart of the response to climate change.

Making a Reality of Access to Legal Research to Deliver the SDGs: Interview with Latia Ward

ხუთ, 19/09/2019 - 15:59

Limited access to research not only prevents people in many countries from contributing to the latest thinking and innovations, but also means that they cannot apply this knowledge in their own societies.

This is as true for legal research as it is in purely scientific fields, with the result that local legal scholars are less able to raise awareness of and use key instruments and concepts that could help improve lives. GOALI - Global Online Access to Legal Information - seeks to make progress.

To find out more, we interviewed Latia Ward. Latia is a Research Services Librarian and Diversity Fellow at Cornell University Law Library.  She created the tutorials, exercises, and instructional video on how to use GOALI which are available at the International Labour Organization’s website.  She may be reached via email at latiaward@cornell.edu or on Twitter @tia_ward17.

1) What were the key motivations for the creation of GOALI?​

Research4Life partners which include United Nations agencies such as the International Labour Organization, publishers such as those affiliated with the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers, and academic institutions such as Cornell University and Yale University, formed the Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI) platform to close the knowledge gap between nations of wealth and nations of more modest means.  GOALI aligns with Goal 16 of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, “Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societies.” 

Through GOALI, Research4Life partners facilitate access to legal information for researchers in the Global South by providing the GOALI platform free of charge or at a low cost.  In their paper entitled Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI) – A New Legal Training Resource for Developing Countries, Richelle Van Snellenberg, Unit Head of the ILO Library and Edit Horvàth, User and Outreach Officer of the ILO Library note that access to legal information online has increased in the last 20 years.  In addition, Richelle and Edit cite legal professionals' need for legal information in order to participate in policy-making and promote the rule of law. 

Specifically, they mention how an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development survey revealed that almost 40% of respondents had not heard of major international instruments relevant to anticorruption such as the United Nations Convention Against Corruption.  GOALI aims to make information available so that legal professionals can be knowledgeable.

When legal professionals are knowledgeable, they can assist in closing the justice gap.  Recently, I came across a report on access to justice by the World Justice Project (WJP).  Over the course of 2017 and 2018, the World Justice Project surveyed people in 101 nations, including both developed and developing countries, and found that most people experiencing legal problems or access to justice issues seek advice from family members and friends. 

Less than one third of respondents consulted lawyers.  The WJP also found that less than one third of people recognized that their problem was a legal problem.  This survey dealt with access to civil justice as opposed to criminal justice.  While the survey results do not answer the question of why access to justice issues persist (with the exception of noting the percentage of people who said that they did not have the money necessary to solve the problem) or what lawyers can do to bridge the justice gap, the survey provides valuable information. 

While GOALI is a service for institutionally affiliated lawyers, legal scholars, and researchers, and not the general public, the users of GOALI who are engaged in the provision of legal services can use the survey results to inform their provision of legal services and develop outreach methods to solve access to justice issues.

 

2) Could you explain your work regarding GOALI and why you are interested in GOALI?

Each one of the Research4Life Partners involved with GOALI has an assigned task.  For example, the UN agencies focus on training, outreach, and technology for the platform.  Publishers contribute databases, monographs, and journal articles.  The academic partners also have a role to play.  The Lillian Goldman Law Library at Yale Law School manages content selection and Cornell University Law Library of Cornell Law School focuses on end-user training. 

As part of my work at Cornell University Law Library, I have created a tutorial video, tutorials (presentation slides with step-by-step instructions on how to use GOALI), and exercises for users of GOALI.  I created the video, tutorials, and exercises in during the spring and early summer of 2018 (with additional updates to the video in July 2019).  In my development of the user guides, I reviewed exercises and modules for the AGORA portal and created exercises and tutorials specific to GOALI. 

I discuss this work in the blog post Creating Training Resources for GOALI which appears in the DipLawMatic Dialogues blog of the Foreign Comparative and International Law Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries.  As I was creating the GOALI video, for which I provided the narration and demonstrations of research paths, I kept accessibility in mind, therefore, I included closed captions and on-screen text to indicate important features of the portal and to identify items.

Access to justice and access to information are areas of interest for me in my work as a librarian.  I have spoken at national conferences on access to justice (I facilitated a round table discussion entitled “What Can Law Librarians Do To Facilitate Access to Justice?” at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting and Conference in 2018 and presented “What Can Librarians Do To Facilitate Access to Justice?” at the Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction Conference in 2019).  I see preparing resources on how to use GOALI for researchers as promoting access to information.  Access to information is important because it can facilitate access to justice.

 

3) How many resources are available through GOALI?

I stay in contact via email with Richelle Van Snellenberg, Unit Head of the ILO Library and Edit Horvàth, User and Outreach Officer of the ILO Library, who are deeply involved with the promotion of GOALI and making its resources available to users.  Edit has noted that GOALI provides access to 2,500 peer-reviewed journals, 12,000 academic books, and 35 additional information resources in the legal field.  Leading academic publishers are represented among the resources.  For example, the Oxford Legal Research Library (OLRL), a resource of Oxford University Press, is available for most registered institutions.

 

4) What other materials can you find there?

In addition to the journal articles, books, databases, and reference sources already mentioned, GOALI includes resources from the legal field as well as other fields within the social sciences.  Open access resources such as African Journals Online (AJOL) and the ILO’s NATLEX database of national labor, social security, and human rights legislation are also available through GOALI.  Both academic and professional publications are available through GOALI.  With the exception of resources such as ILO’s NATLEX database and Google Scholar (to which GOALI provides hyperlinks), primary sources such as statutes and case law are not available through GOALI.

 

5) How do you see GOALI changing the work of libraries in beneficiary countries?

I see GOALI as making legal information more accessible for researchers in eligible countries.  As Edit and Richelle have noted in their paper cited above, Legal Information Institutes have predominated in primarily industrialized and English-speaking nations.  In addition to the open access legal information resources that libraries can share with their patrons, GOALI is another resource for libraries in eligible countries and this resource expands the access to legal information.

 

6) What plans are there to measure its impact?

Richelle has noted that GOALI logins can be measured and disaggregated by country and institution type and that feedback from GOALI users has been encouraging.  She has stated that she wants to expand awareness of GOALI and may seek to review the impact of GOALI in the future.

 

7) How can a library find out if it can benefit from GOALI?

Researchers have access to GOALI through their institutions. Leaders of institutions should see if the country in which they are located is eligible for access to GOALI.  Research4Life maintains a list of nations eligible for access.

 

8) How do you recommend that an eligible library can start?

Leaders of eligible libraries and other institutions should complete Research4Life’s registration form.  Researchers can check to see if their institution is already registered with Research4Life.

 

9) How might it benefit people who aren’t affiliated with institutions?

People who are not affiliated with Research4Life eligible institutions do not have access to GOALI.  However, information professionals who have an interest in making legal information more accessible may ask publishers that they know to contribute resources to GOALI and inform institutions in eligible nations about GOALI. 

For additional ideas of how information professionals may be of service see Librarian Yuksel Serindag's GOALI Initiative presentation slides from the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting and Conference in July 2019.

 

10) What does GOALI mean for the effort towards full open access?

GOALI is a step forward in the effort towards full open access.  Through GOALI, researchers in the Global South have access to peer-reviewed, scholarly articles, monographs, and databases to which they would not otherwise have access.  There are two targets of UN Sustainable Development Goal 16 that specifically address the rule of law and information. 

First, target 16.3 states “Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all.”  GOALI aligns with target 16.3 because it is a resource available to a variety of nations and it facilitates knowledge of legal resources, such knowledge which in turn promotes equal access to justice. 

Second, GOALI aligns with target 16.10 which states, “Ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms, in accordance with national legislation and international agreements.”  The GOALI portal actually provides links to many resources that are open access and available to the general public, however, organizing these resources in one place allows the user to browse additional resources of which the user may not have been aware.  Information professionals who care about access to justice and access to information should promote the GOALI Portal and the information resources to which it provides access.

 

Find our more about IFLA's work on libraries, access to information and development. In particular, see our Get Into SDG Action Week brief.

Library History Special Interest Group at IFLA 2019 Athens

ხუთ, 19/09/2019 - 10:30

Since the IFLA Library History Special Interest Group (SIG) decided to partner with another IFLA section on a session at the conference, we had a 2-hour time slot in which we were able to hold a business meeting for the SIG. I thank those who joined us for this meeting as it was great to meet up with some of the SIG’s "Committee" as well as welcome some new faces.

The discussions assisted the SIG considerably with its future planning and all will be revealed in our Action Plan for 2019-2020.  Suffice to say that there was considerable interest in the SIG playing a role in recording the oral histories of librarians around the world, as well as investigating what has already been done in this regard.  And in addition the SIG will have some involvement in a plan to record the oral stories of IFLA’s Past Presidents and Secretaries General.

The IFLA Library History Special Interest Group (SIG) decided to partner with the IFLA Section on Local History and Genealogy for a session at the IFLA 2019 conference in Athens in Session 271, Local History Collections, Genealogy and Oral History as Critical Information Services in Libraries - Local History and Genealogy with Asia & Oceania Section and Library History.  Those at well attended session heard papers on:

  • Safeguarding the local history and tracing the genealogical history of Balifrom generation to generation | Ari Kurnia (Airlangga University, Java, Indonesia)
  • Inheritance and Innovation: Local History Collections in the Academy Library | Shunqing Wang (Fudan University Library, Shanghai, China)
  • Archival research project. The unknown story of the Athens Municipal Library as part of the city’s history | Georgia Antonopoulou (Athens, Athens, Greece)Vasiliki Sfika (Athens, Athens, Greece)
  • Oral Histories in Africa: Preserving Critical Knowledge | Cherie Bush (FamilySearch International, United States, United States) Russell Lynch (FamilySearch International, United States, United States)
  • The Manila American Library exhibit at the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exhibition | Brendan Luyt (Nanyang Technological University, Jurong West, Singapore) Karryl Kim Sagun (Nanyang Technological University, Jurong West, Singapore.

And here is a photo of the presenters and the session organisers:

Some of us were able to attend “Committee” member Peter Lor’s book launch:

  • International and Comparative Librarianship: A thematic approach and we congratulate him on this wonderful achievement.

During the Closing Session on 29 August, IFLA President Glòria Pérez-Salmerón and IFLA Professional Committee Chair Raissa Teodori included in the conferring of the honours and awards two IFLA members who have had a long history of support for library history with the IFLA Scroll of Appreciation presented to:

  • Jeanne Drewes.  For her distinguished contribution to IFLA and international librarianship, particularly in the field of preservation and conservation.

  • Steve Witt. For his extensive contribution to IFLA over many years and his engagement in international librarianship, particularly in the field of research and publication.

Nor can we forget the wonderful cultural experiences that the people from Athens shared with us during the opening and closing ceremonies and the cultural evening – a conference to remember!

 

Dr Kerry Smith, FALIA, AM

Convenor IFLA Library History SIG