IFLA

  • user warning: Table './drup1/drusessions' is marked as crashed and last (automatic?) repair failed query: SELECT COUNT(sid) AS count FROM drusessions WHERE timestamp >= 1596764079 AND uid = 0 in /var/www/drup/includes/session.inc on line 120.
  • user warning: Table './drup1/drusessions' is marked as crashed and last (automatic?) repair failed query: SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT s.uid) FROM drusessions s WHERE s.timestamp >= 1596764079 AND s.uid > 0 in /var/www/drup/modules/user/user.module on line 776.
ინფოარხების ცნობების შეკრება
Updated: 1 საათი 3 წუთი-ს წინ

IFLA joins European Library Associations in Calling for Effective Support for Education, Research, Culture and Digital Inclusion

4 საათი 15 წუთი წინ

IFLA alongside EBLIDA, LIBER, NAPLEPublic Libraries 2030 and SPARC Europe has signed a joint letter calling on European leaders to reconsider their choices around the EU budget for 2021-27, and, in particular to do better for research, education, culture and digital inclusion.

At any time, the process of agreeing the European Union’s Multi-Year Financial Framework would be important. Now, faced with the need to support the response to and recovery from COVID-19, the choices made are essential.

With over a trillion euros planned spending over seven years, the Framework has the potential to make a real difference to many aspects of European life, complementing national spending, and realising the potential of cross-border cooperation.

European Union spending has contributed to valuable progress in areas where libraries are active.

Spending on culture has supported digitisation and access. Spending on research has brough experts together in order to make real advances and support open access and open science. Spending on education has allowed for generations of young people to study elsewhere, and professional connections to be built across borders. Spending on digital inclusion has allowed great ideas to be developed and shared.

These efforts have brought real benefits to so many lives so far. They will also be essential into the future, as Europe looks not only to recover, but to build back better.

This is why the decision by Member States in their recent negotiations on the Union’s budget seem so unhelpful. These threaten to cut spending on research, to freeze that on culture and digital culture, and to pass only minimal increases to support for education.

A statement prepared by associations representing libraries in Europe – IFLA, EBLIDA, LIBER, SPARC Europe and NAPLE – welcomes the steps already taken by Members of the European Parliament to call for change, and offers the support of our institutions across the bloc.

The statement is available below:

Covid-19 is the worst crisis affecting Europe since the Second World War. Many people are facing unemployment or reduced hours of work ; pupils and students are attending schools and universities only to a limited extent. During these difficult times, libraries have shown great resilience. In many cases and in many countries, librarians have reached out to citizens in need and have helped, and continue to help them to get access to education and information with broadband internet and media, in spite of adverse conditions. This is clearly shown by various EBLIDAIFLANAPLE Reports, LIBER StatementSPARC Europe resources and PL 2030 Lighthouse Sessions.

The unprecedented effort that has been put together to support the European post-Covid recovery phase cannot be to the detriment of culture, education, research, social and digital inclusion, cultural heritage and democracy. The world of libraries is concerned about the inadequacy of the European response in relation to programmes relating to all of these areas, notably the Creative Europe and Horizon Europe programmes and those helping Europe’s citizens make the most of digital technologies. As such, we endorse the resolution of the European Parliament of 23 July.

While support for economic recovery under the new  Multiannual Financial Framework is welcome, the Multiyear Financial Framework deals either cuts, or falls far short of previous commitments in key areas, risking seriously reducing the ability of the EU’s action in areas such as culture, research and digital inclusion to deliver on its potential.  Erasmus+, Creative Europe, the EU’s research programmes, and those for digital inclusion support advanced and very successful projects which all European citizens consider as the most apparent symbols of European cohesion and identity. It is a fact that the Erasmus generation has made Europe and it is hard to see how our next EU generation will contribute to a stronger Europe if European cultural and educational cooperation is neglected. Similarly, the EU’s research programmes are helping Europe to realise its potential as a global leader.

The European library world represented by EBLIDAIFLALIBERNAPLEPL 2030 and SPARC Europe is therefore calling for stronger financial support for culture, education, research and digital inclusion and an increase of the resources allocated to relevant programmes. 

Suriname’s libraries align with the IFLA Strategy

ხუთ, 06/08/2020 - 12:28

IFLA is organising a series of regional workshops on Strategies for Stronger Libraries in order to bring the IFLA Strategy to libraries worldwide. A key focus is on using the Strategy to identify priorities and high-impact actions that can be taken, including coordination with IFLA.

As a result of its participation at the regional workshop for Latin America and the Caribbean, the Foundation Nationale Database Suriname (NDS)–which acts as a Suriname’s Library Association–decided to focus on library education in the country.

This work relates to IFLA’s Strategic Direction 2: Inspire and Enhance Professional Practice of the IFLA Strategy 2019-2024.

The Foundation recognised that Suriname has a structural lack of qualified active librarians. Most libraries are managed by trained library assistants. Librarians were trained in the Netherlands and they then trained qualified library assistants.

The Foundation had organized the last training in 2010. However, with the last active librarian due to retire in 2021, the need to train new qualified library managers is urgent.

In 2019 the Foundation received a grant from the GO Fonds Foundation (Netherlands) to execute a Project: “The Library School Suriname: expertise for Surinamese libraries”. With this project they want to overcome the shortage of qualified library staff in Suriname. Besides setting up a library school they decided to organise two library programmes, one for library managers and one for library assistants. The instructors will be local, regional and international library experts.

The curriculum of the ‘Training Library managers’ course consists primarily of various management skills and important information about the library sector.

However, there is a specific module, entitled ‘Introduction to Librarianship’ which will focus on global, regional and local librarianship, collection development, information services, information 

processing and consortia. There is also a dedicated subject titled “Global Librarianship” that will deal with IFLA, the IFLA Strategy 2019-2024 and the IFLA Library Map of the World.

Jane W.F. Smith, director of the University Library of Suriname and President of the Foundation NDS said:

Librarianship in Suriname can really benefit from the IFLA Strategy. The value of getting engaged in IFLA and planning actions aligned to the IFLA Strategy is about our national library success planning. It means making evident to the next Surinamese library leaders that being active internationally and belonging in the global library field, where you can discuss, exchange, reflect and always improve, is more important than ever before. Therefore, this year in the Library University of Suriname, which is the coordinator for the Foundation NDS, we started a library school, where the IFLA Strategy is part of the curriculum at the training of Library Managers. Sharing this information is not only a way to inform, but to also create awareness about IFLA.”

The program is ready to kick-off, as soon as the situation with COVID-19 allows it. We’re looking forward to following how it goes!

Read more about the IFLA Strategy 2019-2024

How is your library or library association engaging with the IFLA Strategy? Let us know! Post on your social media, using the hashtag #IFLAStrategy and #WeAreIFLA or send an email to Despina Gerasimidou, IFLA’s Strategic Development Officer at despina.gerasimidou@ifla.org.

 

     

Convening Notice for IFLA General Assembly 2020 in The Hague, The Netherlands

ოთხ, 05/08/2020 - 11:07

IFLA’s General Assembly – the primary opportunity for our Members to take decisions about our Federation – will take place on 5 November 2020 in The Hague, The Netherlands. The formal Convening Notice, published today, sets out details about the topics for discussions, and opportunities for participation.

2020 has been a year of significant disruption, including the cancellation of the planned World Library and Information Congress.

While it is sad not to be meeting in person and sharing the ideas and energy that power our field, IFLA’s work continues, including planning for our General Assembly – the key moment for our Members to make decisions about our Federation.

As announced two weeks ago, this meeting will take place on 5 November 2020, at the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague, The Netherlands. IFLA is, today, publishing the official Convening Notice.

It is clear that many of IFLA’s Members will not be able to be physically present, and so we will maximise possibilities for remote participation. Further information will be provided subsequently.

All IFLA Members that have paid their membership fees for 2020 are eligible to vote. Details of voting arrangements, including more information on the process for proxy voting will be distributed by 5 September 2020.

Gerald Leitner
Secretary General

Governance Survey Results: You Spoke, We Listened, Our Next Steps Together

სამ, 28/07/2020 - 12:00

Broad agreement with the directions of the Governance Review Draft Proposal is a key result of the survey which many of you completed. However, there were areas of concern and a hunger for more detail. In our next phase, IFLA’s members and volunteers will have the opportunity to hear more and provide their input.

IFLA’s Governing Board met virtually on 23 July in order to discuss progress so far on IFLA’s Governance Review, and to define next steps. Key to the deliberations were the results of the survey of IFLA’s members and volunteers that took place between 22 June and 14 July.

The meeting marked the half-way point in a crucial round of consultations that will allow the Board to improve the existing proposals for IFLA’s new governance structures.

These consultations – coming after 10 months of hard work by the Governing Board, and building strongly on the results of an earlier survey of members and volunteers – are an essential step towards defining the final proposals that will be put to a vote by IFLA’s Members.

The next step, based on the Board’s conclusions, will be a series of virtual round tables in August which will look to draw on views and expertise from every part of the world, and every area where IFLA is active.

Much Done, but Much Still to Do

As highlighted in our news story following the closure of the survey, we have seen a very strong level of response from IFLA’s Members and volunteers. The 764 responses received represent a 29% response rate, well above what would be expected for such surveys in general. 

Furthermore, a number of IFLA’s professional units and members have shared views via letters, providing additional valuable feedback for the Governing Board, in preparation for the next step of the review.

This underlines the level of commitment to the future of IFLA, and a readiness to share views and ideas. This will be indispensable in order to make a success of the review.

The results, which we are happy to share with you today, demonstrate widespread support for the overall direction of IFLA’s transformation, but also work still to do.

Download the full survey results [PDF – 2MB]

For example, the survey helped underline strong support in particular for steps that will create new opportunities for emerging leaders, as well as in creating structures that will reflect regional diversity. Among respondents, those from library associations, and the Middle East and North Africa were generally most favourable.

At the same time, there is a clear hunger for more information about what the Governance Review may mean for all those who dedicate their time and energy to IFLA.

Clearly, too, there are opportunities for improvements better to achieve the goals set by our Members and volunteers in our survey in October of last year: more transparency, efficiency and collaboration, stronger regional representation, greater financial and organisational sustainability, more varied opportunities for participation, and better support for volunteers.

In some areas, the feedback was sufficiently clear and unambiguous to allow the Governing Board to consider ideas for changes to the proposals. Elsewhere, we are looking forward both to giving a clearer picture of the proposals, and getting a clearer picture of how IFLA’s governance can work better.

Next Steps: Virtual Round Tables

To do this, further engagement with our members and volunteers, with strong opportunities to share perspectives based on their experience of how IFLA works for them, will continue to be indispensable.

The next phase of our consultation will therefore look not only to answer as many of the questions raised as possible, but also to stimulate discussion and debate on key issues.

They will, in particular, provide an opportunity to explore issues such as how the proposed Regional Council and Divisions can achieve the goal of better regional representation, and what action may be needed elsewhere, what can be done to ensure opportunities for new and diverse voices across the Federation, and what IFLA will look like for its volunteers and members.

We look forward to sharing further information about these plans shortly.

Gerald Leitner
IFLA Secretary General

IFLA/UNESCO Multicultural Library Manifesto Toolkit now available in Spanish

სამ, 28/07/2020 - 05:55

The IFLA/UNESCO Multicultural Library Manifesto Toolkit was developed by IFLA Library Services to Multicultural Populations Section (MCULTP) for the purpose of giving practical approaches on how libraries can apply the concepts contained in the Manifesto.

Thanks to the work of our American colleagues Kirsten Grünberg, Freda Mosquera, and Alicia K. Long, a Spanish translation of the Toolkit is now available. Kirsten is a librarian and supervisor at Hyattsville Library. Freda is a librarian, writer, and translator, working as the Community Library Manager at Broward County Library. Alicia is a librarian and educator, working as the Library Supervisor at the State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota. 

Since the original English version was launched in 2012, the full Toolkit has been made available of the Toolkit webpage in Chinese, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish.

 

Your input is needed! Please take the GIOPS Member Survey, deadline extended to July 31

ორშ, 27/07/2020 - 20:26

This week is your last chance to take part in the GIOPS Member Survey!
We need your answers to improve the GIOPS Service for government librarians and librarians in related fields.

​GIOPS wants to better support you in the future. This is why we need to know
your ideas and the challenges you face in your job. It only takes 15 minutes to fill in the questionnaire:
https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5472298/GIOPS-Survey-of-Government-Information-Librarians-2020
Please complete the survey by July 31, 2020.

Thanks in advance for your input!

Now Available: IFLA Asia and Oceania Regional Quarterly Newsletter - July 2020 Issue

კვი, 26/07/2020 - 21:30

Dear Friends,

Please see attached the July 2020 issue of our IFLA Asia and Oceania Regional Quarterly Newsletter.

Hope all of you are well during this period.

To brave the situation, more libraries are re-opening with safety measures adopted.

We have featured some of these libraries, as well as how webminars and virtual conferences are carried out.

Do enjoy reading and have a great weekend ahead.

Take care everyone and stay safe.

~Please open the PDF attachment to access the links. ~

Thank you.

Regards,

Soh Lin Li

Regional Manager

IFLA Regional Office for Asia and Oceania

 

 

Interlibrary loaning across the globe: a gap turned into a successful new global service by an IFLA Professional Unit

პარ, 24/07/2020 - 15:33

 

IFLA’s Document Delivery and Resource-Sharing Professional Unit (IFLA DDRS) has launched a new service to support the sharing of resources across borders as a way of relieving some of the disruption caused by the pandemic.  

 

The COVID-19 global pandemic continues to affect all aspects of education and research worldwide. Libraries face numerous challenges in maintaining existing services and programs, including providing access to physical and digital collections.  

IFLA’s Document and Delivery Resource Sharing Standing Committee provides a solution, that is aligned with the IFLA strategy and specifically Key Initiative 3.2. 

 

 

 

 

 

To offset these challenges, the IFLA DDRS Professional Unit collaborated with Open Access Button, a non-profit committed to connecting users with free, legal, full-text content, to create an online request form for libraries. The Committee recruited volunteers from libraries around the world and created a resource sharing service to supply content when local resource sharing options have been exhausted. 

The Committee recruited volunteers from libraries around the world and created a resource sharing service to supply content when local resource sharing options have been exhausted. This project became known as RSCVD, a play on words that is both short for “received” and “resource sharing COVID” accessible at https://rscvd.org/.  

The project has been an incredible success. In just over two months, it received over 5,400 requests from around the world.

Staffed by 116 volunteers from 17 countries, the reach and depth of resources and participation has continued to grow. At this time, the program has a 51% fill rate on requests, which is impressive given the fledgling network of volunteers.  

Given the success of the RSCVD program, the Committee has tasked a small working group to begin discussing how to build on this success and establish the service permanently.  

 

The statistics of the engagement between April 21st and July 12th. 

The vision for the future of RSCVD is not to replace local and regional resource sharing networks. Instead, it is a way to bridge and connect libraries across the world! 

Want to get involved? Contact the IFLA DDRS RSCVD organisers at ifladdrs@gmail.com 

 

Libraries Supporting Digital Governance: Insights from the 2020 UN E-Government Survey

პარ, 24/07/2020 - 14:38

E-government – the use of ICT to deliver public services and conduct government operations – aims not only to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the public sector, but also to promote the values of openness, transparency, accountability and public access to information.

These principles are of course relevant to the work and values of the library field; and libraries can offer support to digital government initiatives and strategies. The 2020 UN E-Government Survey Report offers some insights on the way libraries can help build inclusive and effective e-governments.

 

The growth of digital government

The United Nations E-Government Survey, conducted by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, maps and examines the development of digital government across all UN member states. The survey was first launched in 2001, and today new installments are released biannually.

To measure e-government readiness and capacity across different states and regions, as well as track changes over time, the Survey Report uses the E-Government Development Index (EGDI). This is a compound measurement developed specifically for this survey, sometimes reviewed and adjusted to account for the changing e-governance and ICT landscape.

It is based on three dimensions: telecommunications infrastructure, human capital, and online content and services. Data for the first two are derived from International Telecommunications Union and UNESCO sources, while the latter is measured through a survey distributed to UN member states.

Drawing on the 2020 EGDI scores, the most recent survey report points out that the uptake and quality of digital government worldwide continue to grow. Across all UN Member States, the global average EGDI score has increased, and more countries (now 65%) received a high or very high score.

Overall, the average EGDI scores of all five regions (Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania) have grown since the last instalment of the report.

However, a chapter dedicated to regional trends notes several common opportunities and challenges shared across different regions; and one of such challenges has to do with connectivity and access to technology (and sometimes digital skills). From an end-user access perspective, this is an area where libraries can offer help.

Public internet access in libraries as part of an e-government strategy

The report points out that free internet access in places such as libraries can help overcome challenges of insufficient connectivity or affordability of internet access of devices. This helps more people benefit from available e-governance tools and services – which is why one of the E-Governance Survey questions asks about the “existence of free access to government services through kiosks, community centers, post offices, libraries, public spaces of free Wi-Fi”.

What does library public access contribute to? The analysis that follows references public internet access to e-government services in two contexts. First, their availability is one of the indicators included in the supplementary E-Participation Index – a scale which measures how the deeply the government engages the public online; ranging from information provision, to consultation, to decision-making.

The second perspective points to how free public access helps bridge the digital divide at large – one of the measures aimed at building up society’ digital capacity and ensuring that no-one is left behind. This, in turn, helps facilitate the uptake and use of digital public services. Alongside institutional, organisational and individual capacities, society-level digital capacity enables effective e-government transformation.

Finally, free public internet access in libraries and similar venues is part of the more recently developed Local Online Service Index. This examines e-government mechanisms on a city level.

The assessment is built on four dimensions – technical features of city portals, content provision (availability of key public information and resources online, to which free public internet access contributes), online service provision, and opportunities for public participation and engagement.

The report notes that overall, city portals tend not to perform as well as national ones. Inadequate infrastructure and substantial technology costs can be a major challenge for local e-government, both on the supply and demand sides. Here, free public internet access can be a useful tool to help reduce costs for users.

The takeaway. In short, free internet access in libraries, community centers, kiosks and similar venues can facilitate e-participation and use of e-services, help bridge digital divides and build up society’s digital capacity for e-governance transformation. The report therefore points out:

“Since private Internet access is not possible in many contexts, Governments must expand public access options, including Wi-Fi hotspots in public spaces, Internet kiosks for services, and similar alternatives. Such measures require significant public investment and will need to be funded from national budgets, though outside partnerships might ease the financial burden and also invite innovation.”

“The top priorities for local government authorities should be bringing people online and increasing their satisfaction. Governments can facilitate access to e-services by ensuring that Wi-Fi services (and in some cases Wi-Fi-enabled devices) are available at existing public venues such as libraries, city halls, educational institutions, and kiosks, and Wi-Fi access can be provided in public spaces such as transport stations, parks and hospitals.”

How many? As of the 2020 update, 91 countries offered free access to government services and/or free WiFi online through kiosks, libraries or post offices, community centers and other facilities. At the local level, 48.8% out of 100 examined cities offered such access.

Beyond public access

While not referencing libraries directly, the report also addresses several areas which may be of interest to the library sector. 

For example, adult literacy levels - while not measured by the Member State Questionnaire - do contribute to the total e-government scores of each country. As mentioned earlier, the total scores are derived from three elements: the Online Service Index, measured through a dedicated questionnaire, the Telecommunications Infrastructure Index, and the Human Capital Index. Adult literacy rate is one of the four components measuring the Human Capital Index; so it can be useful for libraries to reflect on the work they do to support literacy and lifelong learning through the lens of e-government.

Similarly, libraries may also find interesting the report’s insights on the digital and e-participation skills important for the public at large (considering libraries’ experience with digital skills training and e-participatory programming like hackathons or editathons), as well as open public/government data.

To find out more, you can read the full survey report at the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Public Institutions website.

Consultation on Marrakesh Treaty in Brazil Closing Shortly

ხუთ, 23/07/2020 - 18:55

A crucial moment in the implementation of the Marrakesh Treaty in Brazil is approaching, with a consultation on implementing regulations closing tomorrow. Libraries are active in calling for this to respect international best practice and respect the spirit of the Treaty.

Brazil was one of the first countries to sign and ratify the Marrakesh Treaty, even before it entered into force globally. The country was also a leader in pressing for the Treaty’s agreement in the first place.

The country is now in the process of finalising its own national laws in order to make a reality of access. This brings the potential to remove unnecessary copyright-related barriers to access to knowledge for people with print disabilities.

As part of this, there have been extensive debates among professional of various sectors, in particular through a working group to discuss relevant regulations and their implementation, organized by the Secretariat for Copyright and Intellectual Property (SDAPI) between October and December 2019.

The Brazilian Library Association, FEBAB, has been strongly representing the interests of libraries and their users, reaffirming its commitment in defense of libraries, library users and other information institutions and enforcing the broad and unrestricted access to all.

Latest Developments

Following the preparation of draft texts, a consultation is currently taking place, with a deadline of 24 July.

A particular question is whether Brazil should oblige people with print disabilities and the institutions that support them to check whether accessible format copies are available on the market before making or sharing them.

IFLA and partner organizations have long argued against the inclusion of such proposals. Indeed, among those countries which have legislated to implement the Marrakesh Treaty, 79% of countries[i] that have taken a decision on commercial availability decided to not include it (34 have ruled the commercial availability out, 9 countries have decided to implement it, while 49 countries have yet to adapt their national rules).

FEBAB has shared its concerns via a statement on this topic, underlining the risk that it will weaken the goals of the Marrakesh Treaty:

1 - Difficulty in defining universally what is a “work in accessible format”.
2 - Difficulty in defining what “reasonable access conditions” would be.
3 - The spirit of the Treaty is not the formation of a market, but the guarantee of a right.
4 - The clause would create insecurity in delivering the main promise of the Treaty, which is cross-border exchange.
5 - The absence of this clause does not affect the Berne Convention's Three-Step Rule,  as already established in Footnote n. 5 of the Marrakesh Treaty itself.

FEBAB has been very active in mobilising librarians, information professionals and other interested third parties to participate within this open call. Its Copyright and Open Access Brazilian Committee (CBDA3) launched several campaigns on social media, webinars and discussion groups.

Discover IFLA’s guide to start with the Marrakesh Treaty, adapted and translated by FEBAB in Portuguese.

 

 

[i] The Marrakesh Treaty Implementation, March 2020, update

 

Consultation on Marrakesh Treaty in Brazil Closing Shortly

ხუთ, 23/07/2020 - 18:55

A crucial moment in the implementation of the Marrakesh Treaty in Brazil is approaching, with a consultation on implementing regulations closing tomorrow. Libraries are active in calling for this to respect international best practice and respect the spirit of the Treaty.

Brazil was one of the first countries to sign and ratify the Marrakesh Treaty, even before it entered into force globally. The country was also a leader in pressing for the Treaty’s agreement in the first place.

The country is now in the process of finalising its own national laws in order to make a reality of access. This brings the potential to remove unnecessary copyright-related barriers to access to knowledge for people with print disabilities.

As part of this, there have been extensive debates among professional of various sectors, in particular through a working group to discuss relevant regulations and their implementation, organized by the Secretariat for Copyright and Intellectual Property (SDAPI) between October and December 2019.

The Brazilian Library Association, FEBAB, has been strongly representing the interests of libraries and their users, reaffirming its commitment in defense of libraries, library users and other information institutions and enforcing the broad and unrestricted access to all.

Latest Developments

Following the preparation of draft texts, a consultation is currently taking place, with a deadline of 24 July.

A particular question is whether Brazil should oblige people with print disabilities and the institutions that support them to check whether accessible format copies are available on the market before making or sharing them.

IFLA and partner organizations have long argued against the inclusion of such proposals. Indeed, among those countries which have legislated to implement the Marrakesh Treaty, 79% of countries[i] that have taken a decision on commercial availability decided to not include it (34 have ruled the commercial availability out, 9 countries have decided to implement it, while 49 countries have yet to adapt their national rules).

FEBAB has shared its concerns via a statement on this topic, underlining the risk that it will weaken the goals of the Marrakesh Treaty:

1 - Difficulty in defining universally what is a “work in accessible format”.
2 - Difficulty in defining what “reasonable access conditions” would be.
3 - The spirit of the Treaty is not the formation of a market, but the guarantee of a right.
4 - The clause would create insecurity in delivering the main promise of the Treaty, which is cross-border exchange.
5 - The absence of this clause does not affect the Berne Convention's Three-Step Rule,  as already established in Footnote n. 5 of the Marrakesh Treaty itself.

FEBAB has been very active in mobilising librarians, information professionals and other interested third parties to participate within this open call. Its Copyright and Open Access Brazilian Committee (CBDA3) launched several campaigns on social media, webinars and discussion groups.

Discover IFLA’s guide to start with the Marrakesh Treaty, adapted and translated by FEBAB in Portuguese.

 

 

[i] The Marrakesh Treaty Implementation, March 2020, update

 

IFLA PressReader International Marketing Award Winners 2020

ოთხ, 22/07/2020 - 23:05

The IFLA PressReader International Marketing Award is presented by the IFLA Section on Management and Marketing in collaboration with the award sponsor PressReader. This award, in its 17th year, honours organizations which implement creative, results-oriented marketing projects or campaigns. 

Foshan Library (China) is the 1st place winner of the coveted IFLA PressReader International Marketing Award for 2020.

Foshan Library (China) wins 1st place for their N-Library: To Forge a Closer Community of Shared Future. N-Library, an abbreviation of “Neighborhood Library,” helps families build libraries at home by moving collected books and resources of public libraries to their homes. With the aid of information technology, 818 N-Libraries function as a mini-public library serving relatives and friends, neighbors, people with disabilities, as well as the elderly.

The 1st place winner receives 3000€ cash award towards airfare, lodging and registration to attend the 2021 IFLA World Library and Information Congress in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Greater Victoria Public Library (Canada) is the 2nd place winner for their campaign Change Your Mind. GVPL decided that it was time to Change Your Mind, using an integrated brand strategy to transform the way people think about libraries in Greater Victoria and well beyond. 

The 2nd place winner receives 2000€ towards airfare, lodging and registration to attend the 2021 IFLA World Library and Information Congress in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Murcia Public Library (Spain) is the 3rd place winner for their campaign Viven en la BRMU / They live in BRMU. The Murcia Public Library decided to change preconceived ideas about libraries, stimulate the intellectual curiosity of users through humor and reflection and open the library to new groups, sensibilities and speeches.

The 3rd place winner receives 1500€ towards airfare, lodging and registration to attend the 2021 IFLA World Library and Information Congress in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Submissions were received from all around the world, with entries from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Canada, Colombia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Malaysia, Nigeria, The Philippines, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Uganda, Ukraine and the United States. The top ten include the first, second and third winners and seven unique projects. Applications were selected via criteria that demonstrated innovative and original project marketing strategies.

The IFLA PressReader International Marketing Award is presented by the IFLA Section on Management and Marketing in collaboration with the award sponsor PressReader. This award, in its 17th year, honours organizations which implement creative, results-oriented marketing projects or campaigns. 

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is the leading international body representing the interests of library and information services and their users. It is the global voice of the library and information profession with more than 1,500 members in 150 countries worldwide. The Headquarters is based The Hague, Netherlands.

“Our goal is that libraries around the world will get inspiration from these amazing campaigns,” says Anya Feltreuter, chair of the IFLA Section on Management and Marketing. “We think the diversity in scope of these projects shows you don’t need a lot of money to successfully market your library and its services. All you need is some research, a good idea, and strategic implementation.” 

As the leading digital and print-on-demand newspaper and magazine platform, PressReader is helping IFLA to recognize and support creative, inspired, results-oriented marketing campaigns. Our top three winners also receive an exclusive one-year VIP account with PressReader. 

“We are so impressed with the winners and their innovative projects,” adds PressReader Director of Libraries Kelly Banks. “It’s exciting to see well-developed campaigns designed to bring communities together, change minds and challenge the perception of what a library can be. Campaigns like these are even more important in 2020, as we navigate what it means to have a contactless library experience. Congratulations to the winning libraries and all those that participated.” 

Our top three winners are:
  1. Foshan Library (China): N-Library to Forge a Closer Community of a Shared Future
  2. Greater Victoria Public Library (Canada): Change Your Mind
  3. Murcia Regional Library (Spain): Viven en la BRMU/They Live in BRMU

In addition to the top three winners, the next seven organizations and their marketing campaigns are recognized for their innovative and creative approaches to marketing (in alphabetical order):

Media inquiries

Jeremiah Walter
Information Coordinator
IFLA Management and Marketing Section
jwalter@ppld.org

About PressReader

PressReader is on a mission to improve the way people discover stories that matter to them. With offices in Vancouver, Dublin and Manila, the company provides the largest all-you-can-read platform of newspapers and magazines where people can discover relevant and trusted content from anywhere in the world, and read global titles like The Guardian, The Independent, Los Angeles Times, and Le Figaro.

Using their phone, tablet or computer, readers can browse content online or download entire issues using the PressReader app. They can subscribe for unlimited access, or get the full experience sponsored by one of its brand partners, businesses that leverage the premium content platform to enhance their customers’ experience – household names like British Airways, Turkish Airlines, Cathay Pacific, Air Canada, Marriott, Fairmont Hotels, Seabourn Cruise Lines, Princeton University, and the New York Public Library.

 

PAC Chile Shares Tips for Preserving Family History at Home [video]

ოთხ, 22/07/2020 - 17:48

IFLA’s Preservation and Conservation (PAC) Centre Chile, hosted by the National Library of Chile, has created a video guide to preserving photographs at home.

In this video, PAC Centre Director Maria Soledad Abarca de la Fuente shares recommendations with viewers on how to care for family photographs – with easy steps one can accomplish with minimal tools at home.

The goal is to show that you do not have to be an expert to better care for your family's photographs. By following the simple recommendations in the video, you can better preserve your family’s heritage for future generations.

Get started with preserving your own family history! Watch here (video in Spanish with English and Spanish subtitles):

 

PAC Chile created this video as part of the programme Memorias del Siglo XX, a project of the National Archives of Chile. With the motto, “Remember stories, build our memory", this project promotes the participation of individuals and communities in the collective processes of preserving local memory and heritage.  

Since 2007, the project has compiled more than 10,000 photographs, which have been digitised and contextualized participatively by community members, and made available on the project's website. 

Find out more about IFLA’s PAC Network here: IFLA PAC

Reports on Relindial Cartonera

ოთხ, 22/07/2020 - 12:42

It has been more than 5 years since the Relindial Cartonera project was launched. Odile Dupont has drawn up a retrospective and statistics which are available in English and in French on the page especially dedicated to this project:

Relindial Cartonera project

EXTENDED DEADLINE (27 August 2020): Call for support - ENSULIB Special Interest Group (SIG) to Section

ოთხ, 22/07/2020 - 01:26

The IFLA Professional Committee has now cleared the way for ENSULIB to move from Special Interest Group status to a Section. Following the IFLA rules, ENSULIB has to gain 40 institutional IFLA members to subscribe an additional membership for the new Section (for 62 € annual fee) or alternatively - free of charge - to exchange another Section membership for this new one.


Therefore, ENSULIB invites all Association and Institutional IFLA Members which are engaged in environment and sustainability issues and supporting the UN Agenda 2030 to sign a membership for the future ENSULIB Section!

Please fill in and send back the corresponding form [Letter of Intention].  

Now we have an extended deadline for supporting ENSULIB Special Interest Group to Section: 27 August 2020
 

Petra Hauke,

ENSULIB Convenor

 

IFLA Takes Part in 2nd WIPO Conversation on Intellectual Property and Artificial Intelligence

სამ, 21/07/2020 - 11:32

IFLA took part in the second session of the conversation on Intellectual Property and Artificial Intelligence organised by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) on 7-9 July 2020.

After the first session on intellectual property and artificial intelligence in September 2019 and due to the COVID-19 situation, WIPO organised the conference in virtual form, in order to discuss issues related to this topic further. Many contributors from all around the world took this opportunity to share their views.

Organised over three days, the conversation centred on topics highlighted in the revised issues paper on intellectual property policy and artificial intelligence, published in May 2020.

The agenda included themes such as IP protection for AI-generated and AI-assisted works and inventions and related topics developed and comments on the notion of inventorship and ownership, the notion of authorship and ownership, deep fakes, copyright policy issues and copyright in training data, further rights in data and trade secrets.

IFLA underlined that legislators should avoid premature regulation of artificial intelligence, given that this area is still evolving rapidly. Any rules passed might become ineffective or harmful to further developments.

Regarding the right to use legally accessed materials for text-and-data mining and training machine learning, IFLA highlighted the necessity for an enforceable cross-border exception, in order to support innovation and provide legal certainty to libraries.

IFLA also raised, once again, one of its primary concerns regarding user rights.

Recent legislation has shown overconfidence in digital tools as a means of identifying when a use of a work counts as copyright infringement, and when an exception of limitation is in play. A balanced regulation system cannot rely on technology alone..

Recordings of the meetings are available:

Day 1: IP Protection for AI-generated and AI-assisted works and inventions and related topics.

Day 2: AI inventions: Patentability, disclosure and guidelines

Day 3: Data: Copyright in Training Data, Further Rights in Data and Trade

You can also read IFLA’s statements:

Session 1: IP protection for AI-generated and AI-assisted works and inventions and related topics

Session 3: Data: Copyright in Training Data, Further Rights in Data and Trade Secrets

 

Restore Balance, Protect Freedoms: Copyright Reforms in Mexico Need Rethinking

ორშ, 20/07/2020 - 21:37

There has been disappointing news from Mexico, where recent copyright legislation risks making access to information significantly harder, while also undermining the role of the judiciary and lawmakers. Local libraries and other actors are calling for a constitutional review.

In early 2019, IFLA published a statement warning of the negative consequences of a proposed law in Mexico which would have obliged the removal of content from the internet, purely on the basis of an allegation of copyright infringement.

Such a move would leave anyone wanting to share knowledge on the internet at risk of seeing their work made unavailable, without any need to offer proof.

In bypassing the legal system, this would not only undermine the role of judges, but also severely weaken free expression, harming creators and readers alike.

Unfortunately, in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, the proposal has reappeared and been voted through the parliament with very little scrutiny, in the context of moves to implement the US-Mexico-Canada Free Trade Agreement.

Furthermore, the new law introduces even tougher protections for digital locks. While these can be a helpful way of preventing piracy, IFLA has long argued that they should not be used to prevent the enjoyment of limitations and exceptions to copyright.

In imposing penalties for circumventing or removing such locks, even when they are blocking legitimate uses, the Mexican parliament risks undermining its own objectives in allowing for library activities such as preservation or private copying.

Steps to implement the Marrakesh Treaty are of course welcome, and should be retained, even as more questionable elements of the law are reviewed.

IFLA Secretary General Gerald Leitner said:

It is a shame to see the same bad ideas back on the table in Mexico, despite the concerns raised by IFLA and many others in the past. For the sake of fundamental freedoms in the country, we urge the government to step back from the extrajudicial enforcement of copyright through obliging takedowns of material purely on the basis of allegations of infringement, and overly broad protection for digital locks’

Finally, a further bill, currently under discussion, risks taxing a wide range of digital devices, such as memory sticks, computers and printers, with money to be gathered by collecting societies. While some public institutions may be spared this, academic libraries risk being affected.

More broadly, measures that will increase the cost of buying and using digital devices are not welcome. As highlighted in the Development and Access to Information framework, there are less than 60 mobile broadband subscriptions per 100 people in the country, and fewer than half of households have access to the internet or a computer. Such moves risks slowing efforts to bring everyone online.

Mexican librarians, with IFLA's support, are working to support calls for a constitutional review, in order to ensure that the country does not pass laws that fail to protect the rights of library users and harm the ability of libraries to fulfil their missions.  

UN, Government and Civil Society Underline Need to Include Culture in post-COVID-19 Planning

ორშ, 20/07/2020 - 18:14

IFLA, alongside partners from the Culture 2030 Goal Coalition, organised a successful side-event at the UN High-Level Political Forum, focusing on culture as an accelerator of development. Victoria Okojie, representing IFLA, underlined the particular contribution that libraries can make.

2020 marks an important year in the process of delivering the Sustainable Development Goals. With just ten years to go to achieve them, and significant additional challenges brought by COVID-19, there is a pressing need to seize all opportunities for strong, equitable and sustainable growth.

The Culture 2030 Goal campaign, of which IFLA is a core member, has therefore been working to build awareness of the need to draw on culture, and cultural actors and institutions, including libraries.

These, we have argued, represent powerful accelerators, unlocking progress in many different areas.

In particular now, with societies needing to show resilience and creativity in responding to COVID-19, and preparing for the recovery, culture can have a key role. This argument is at the core of our statement on Culture and COVID-19.

Following the very welcome endorsement of the statement by the President of the 74th UN General Assembly, HE Mr Tijjani Muhammad-Bande, IFLA participated in a side-event at the UN High Level Political Forum on 13 July 2020.

Bringing together speakers from UNESCO, the World Health Organization, Italy, Canada and a range of major networks, this served to underline the importance of culture, and explore how to make it more central to policy-making now and into the future.

HE Mr Jerobeam Shaanika, representing the President of the General Assembly, stressed: ‘Let there be no mistake, incorporating culture into COVID-19 recovery plans can thus help accelerate 2030 Agenda implementation’.

He noted the particular role of libraries: '

Libraries… are prized repositories of knowledge, and experience, passed through generations, which strengthen humanity’s capacity to overcome adversity and envisage a better future.

UNESCO Assistant Director General Ernesto Ottone added:

As many countries experience confinement, the vital necessity of culture for social cohesion, education and wellbeing was particularly brought to light, and that’s something that everybody is recognising.

Ilaria Ragnoni, Spokesperson of the Mission of Italy to the United Nations, undelined:

Culture, education and innovation must be at the core of our recovery strategies if we aim at building back better.

Representing IFLA, Victoria Okojie, former Board Member, set out a number of key recommendations on how to do this:

First of all, we need governments at all levels to see culture and cultural institutions as both a source of vital information and insights to inform policy, as well as a partner in delivering its policy decisions. […]

Secondly, we need to include cultural issues in our calculations and indicator bases, as UNESCO is already doing.

[…] Thirdly, we need strong signals from the highest levels, such as from the president of the United Nations General Assembly, in order to show the way.

And finally, of course, we need to work without our own fields to build understanding of the potential libraries have to support development and help realise this.

We are grateful to all the participants in the session for their support, including all those quoted above, and also Dr Kirsty Duncan, Member of the Canadian Parliament, Dr Daisy Fancourt, UCL and WHO Europe, José Alfonso Suárez del Real, Co-President of the UCLG Committee on Culture, Pierre Claver Mabiala, President, Arterial Network, Robert Manchin, Culture Action Europe, Maria Claudia Parias Durán, Member of the Board, International Music Council, and Nikiesha Hamilton, Brooklyn Museum. Particular thanks go to Jordi Pascual, Coordinator, UCLG Committee on Culture, and Ege Yildirim, SDGs Focal Point, ICOMOS.

Building on the success of this event, IFLA and its partners will continue to work to build understanding and support for stronger inclusion of culture in plans both for recovery from COVID-19, and long-term development. 

You can watch the recording of the event again on YouTube, and find out more about IFLA's work on libraries and development on our dedicated page.

Extended Call for Agenda Items: IFLA General Assembly 2020

ორშ, 20/07/2020 - 13:37

IFLA's General Assembly 2020 will take place on 5 November 2020, in The Hague, The Netherlands. IFLA's Secretary General Gerald Leitner explains more.

I am pleased to announce that the IFLA General Assembly 2020 is planned to take place on Thursday 5 November 2020 in The Hague.

The closing date for items for inclusion in the agenda – previously set for 11 May – has been extended, and any resolutions from Members should now be submitted by Monday 3 August 2020. Resolutions must be proposed and seconded by authorised representatives of Members, whose names and affiliations must be included. The resolution must clearly express the action recommended to be taken by the Federation. Resolutions must reach the IFLA Secretariat by Monday 3 August 2020. Email: ifla@ifla.org

The formal convening notice for the General Assembly 2020 will be published and distributed on Wednesday, 5 August 2020, and will include details of the meeting time and location, the agenda and arrangements for proxy voting. I am aware that many of you will not be able to attend due to restrictions arising from the COVID-19 pandemic, and so the General Assembly will be live-streamed for those unable to be there in person.

You will be aware that travel restrictions and lockdowns arising from the Covid-19 pandemic can be imposed at very short notice. However, IFLA is required to hold a General Assembly by law, and so if circumstances prevent the General Assembly from taking place as planned, the meeting will be re-arranged for an alternative date and different venue. Full information will be included in the convening announcement to ensure that sufficient notice is given in line with the Statutes.

 

Gerald Leitner

Secretary General
The Hague, Netherlands
20 July 2020